2012年10月19日

バルカン戦争 100年後と暴力の歴史


he Balkan Wars: 100 Years Later, a History of Violence
( TIME )

A century ago today, the Balkan wars began. On Oct. 8, 1912, the tiny
Kingdom of Montenegro declared war on the weak Ottoman Empire,
launching an invasion of Albania, then under nominal Turkish rule.
Three other Balkan states in league with the Montenegrins --
Bulgaria, Greece and Serbia -- rapidly followed suit, waging war on
the old imperial enemy while drawing upon a wellspring of national
sentiment in each of their homelands. By March 1913, their
blood-soaked campaigns had effectively pushed the enfeebled Ottomans
out of Europe. Yet by July, Greece and Serbia would clash with
Bulgaria in what’s known as the Second Balkan War -- a bitter
monthlong struggle that saw more territory change hands, more
villages razed and more bodies dumped into the earth.

The peace that followed was no peace at all. A year later, with
Europe’s great powers entwined in the fate of the Balkans, a
Yugoslav nationalist in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo killed the crown
prince of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Europe plunged into World War I.

“The Balkans,” goes one of the many witticisms attributed to
Winston Churchill, “generates more history than it can locally
consume.” To Churchill and many Western observers of his era, this
rugged stretch of southeastern Europe was a headache, a geopolitical
mess that had for centuries been at the crossroads of empires and
religions, riven by ethnic tribalisms and the meddling of outside
powers. Half a century earlier, Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck
-- the architect of the modern German state -- expressed his disgust
with this nuisance of a region, scoffing that the whole of the
Balkans was “not worth the bones of one Pomeranian grenadier” in
his employ.

But while these grand statesmen of the West saw a backward land
brimming with ancient hatreds, the Balkans’ turbulent past, and the
legacy of the Balkan wars in particular, perhaps offers a more
instructive history lesson for our present than even World War I.
This is not just because the Balkan wars spawned some historic firsts
on the battlefield -- such as the first instance when aircraft was
used to attack an enemy (by the Bulgarians) or some of the first grim
scenes of trench warfare in continental Europe (observers recount
how, in one trench, the legs of dead Turkish soldiers froze into the
ground and had to be hacked off). It’s because in many ways these
battles fought a century ago reflect our world today: one where
internecine and sectarian conflicts -- in, say, Syria or the
Democratic Republic of Congo -- are enmeshed in the agendas of
outside powers and where the trauma of that violence often augurs
more of the same.


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

follow suit:人のまねをする、先例に従う

enfeeble:(人を)弱める

「feeble」が病気・老齢などで「弱った」という意味の形容詞。文中に接頭辞
の「en‐」が付いた動詞がいくつか出てきますので、その働きを確認しておき
ましょう。

(1)名詞に付けて「〜の中に入れる・入る」。「enshrine」「entomb」
(2)名詞に付けて「〜を与える」。「empower」「encourage」
(3)名詞・形容詞に付けて「〜な状態にする」。「endear」「enrich」
(4)動詞に付けて「内に〜する、すっかり〜する」。


■ 2段落目

entwine:からみ合う・合わせる、巻きつく

これが上の4番目のパターンですね。類義語の「tangle」「entangle」もよく
使われます。


■ 3段落目

go:ゴー

「go」は、ある基点から遠ざかっていく動きというのが基本的なイメージなの
ですが、「As the saying goes, …」で「ことわざにもあるように、・・・」。

attribute:(結果や性質などを)〜に帰する、ありとする

riven: 引き裂かれた

ethnic tribalism:民族的部族主義???

未知の言葉なのでちょっと調べましたが、グーグルのフレーズ検索でヒット数
は4千件ほど。ウィキペディアの「National-Anarchism」という項目に出てい
ました。物好き・・・じゃなくて、勉強家の方はこちら↓をどうぞ。

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National-Anarchism

meddle:おせっかいする、干渉する

nuisance:迷惑、厄介なもの、不快なこと

scoff:あざ笑う、冷やかす


■ 4段落目

statesman:政治家

「政治家」には、おなじみの「politician」という言葉もありますが、
「politician」のには否定的なニュアンスがあります。英英辞書
(American Heritage)にはこんな説明が。

One who seeks personal or partisan gain, often by scheming and
maneuvering.

(私的または党派的な利益を求める人で、しばしば術や策を弄する。)

一方の「statesman」には、

A male political leader regarded as a disinterested promoter of the
public good.

(男性の政治指導者で、私欲のない公益の促進者と見なされる。)

brim:あふれそうになる

spawn:(魚・カエルなどが)卵を産む、卵

internecine:内輪同士の、内輪もめの、互いに殺し合う

語意の由来がちょっと面白いので英辞郎の一読を。物好き・・・じゃなくて勉
強家の方は、英英辞書のワード・ヒストリーでどうぞ。

http://www.tfd.com/internecine

enmesh:網の目にからませる

augur:占う、前兆を示す


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


The Balkan Wars: 100 Years Later, a History of Violence
( TIME )


A century ago today,

the Balkan wars began.

On Oct. 8, 1912,

the tiny Kingdom of Montenegro declared war on the weak Ottoman Empire,

launching an invasion of Albania,

then under nominal Turkish rule.

Three other Balkan states

in league with the Montenegrins --

Bulgaria, Greece and Serbia --

rapidly followed suit,

waging war on the old imperial enemy

while drawing upon a wellspring of national sentiment

in each of their homelands.

By March 1913,

their blood-soaked campaigns

had effectively pushed the enfeebled Ottomans out of Europe.

Yet by July,

Greece and Serbia would clash with Bulgaria

in what’s known as the Second Balkan War --

a bitter monthlong struggle

that saw more territory change hands,

more villages razed

and more bodies dumped into the earth.


The peace that followed was no peace at all.

A year later,

with Europe’s great powers entwined in the fate of the Balkans,

a Yugoslav nationalist in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo

killed the crown prince of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Europe plunged into World War I.


“The Balkans,”

goes one of the many witticisms

attributed to Winston Churchill,

“generates more history than it can locally consume.”

To Churchill and many Western observers of his era,

this rugged stretch of southeastern Europe was a headache,

a geopolitical mess

that had for centuries been at the crossroads of empires and religions,

riven by ethnic tribalisms and the meddling of outside powers.

Half a century earlier,

Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck --

the architect of the modern German state --

expressed his disgust with this nuisance of a region,

scoffing

that the whole of the Balkans

was “not worth the bones of one Pomeranian grenadier” in his employ.


But while these grand statesmen of the West

saw a backward land brimming with ancient hatreds,

the Balkans’ turbulent past,

and the legacy of the Balkan wars in particular,

perhaps offers a more instructive history lesson for our present

than even World War I.

This is not

just because the Balkan wars spawned some historic firsts

on the battlefield --

such as the first instance

when aircraft was used to attack an enemy (by the Bulgarians)

or some of the first grim scenes of trench warfare

in continental Europe

(observers recount

how, in one trench,

the legs of dead Turkish soldiers froze into the ground

and had to be hacked off).

It’s because in many ways

these battles fought a century ago reflect our world today:

one where internecine and sectarian conflicts --

in, say, Syria or the Democratic Republic of Congo --

are enmeshed in the agendas of outside powers

and where the trauma of that violence often augurs more of the same.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


バルカン戦争 100年後と暴力の歴史
( TIME )

100年前の今日、バルカン戦争が始まった。1912年10月8日、極小のモンテネグ
ロ王国が弱体化していたオスマン帝国に宣戦布告し、名目上はトルコの支配下
にあったアルバニアへ侵攻を開始した。モンテネグロと同盟を結んだ他のバル
カン3国−−ブルガリア、ギリシア、セルビア−−もすかさず後に続く。古く
からの敵である帝国と戦いながら、それぞれの自国で湧き上がる国民感情に訴
えた。1913年3月には血まみれの軍事作戦で、衰弱していたオスマン帝国を事
実上ヨーロッパから追い出した。だが7月には、ギリシアとセルビアがブルガ
リアと衝突することになる。第二次バルカン戦争として知られる1カ月の厳し
い攻防によって、さらに領土の持ち主は代わり、村々は破壊され、遺体は大地
に打ち捨てられる。

その後の平和には平和のかけらもなかった。1年後、ヨーロッパの強国がバル
カン半島の運命に密接に関わる中、ユーゴスラビアの愛国主義者がサラエボと
いうボスニアの都市でオーストリア=ハンガリー帝国の皇太子を殺害した。
ヨーロッパは第一次世界大戦に突入する。

「バルカン半島では」と、ウィンストン・チャーチルのものとされる数多くの
名言の1つは言う。「地元で消費できないほど多くの歴史が作られる」。チ
ャーチルや当時の西洋の識者にとって、ヨーロッパ南東部の厳しい一帯は頭痛
の種だった。何世紀もの間、帝国と宗教の交差路にあって、エスニック部族主
義や外部の大国の干渉によって引き裂かれてきた地政学的な混乱地域。プロイ
セン宰相オットー・フォン・ビスマルク−−近代ドイツ国家の建設者−−は、
この一筋縄では行かない地域への嫌悪を表して、「バルカン半島全体でも、私
が使うポメラニア兵士1人分の骨の価値もない」と嘲弄した。

だが、こうした大政治家にとっては憎悪に満ちた裏庭の国だったとしても、バ
ルカン半島の激動の過去と、分けてもバルカン戦争の遺産は、現在の私たちに
とって第一次世界大戦にもまして有益な歴史の教訓になるはずだ。その理由は、
ただバルカン戦争が戦場における史上初のものをいくつか生み落としたからで
はない。確かに例を挙げれば、初めて飛行機が(ブルガリア人によって)敵を
攻撃するために使われ、またヨーロッパ大陸の塹壕戦の無残な光景も初めてだ
った(識者が詳述している。どのように塹壕で死んだトルコ兵の足が地面に凍
りつき、切り落とさなければならなかったのか)。その理由は、多くの意味で、
1世紀前に戦われた戦闘が今日の私たちの世界を映し出しているからだ。身内
や宗派の争い−−そう、シリアやシリアやコンゴ民主共和国のように−−が、
外部の大国の計略に組み込まれていたり、そうした暴力のトラウマがさらに同
じことが起こることの凶兆になったりする世界だ。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


The Balkan Wars: 100 Years Later, a History of Violence
( TIME )

A century ago today, the Balkan wars began. On Oct. 8, 1912, the tiny
Kingdom of Montenegro declared war on the weak Ottoman Empire,
launching an invasion of Albania, then under nominal Turkish rule.
Three other Balkan states in league with the Montenegrins --
Bulgaria, Greece and Serbia -- rapidly followed suit, waging war on
the old imperial enemy while drawing upon a wellspring of national
sentiment in each of their homelands. By March 1913, their
blood-soaked campaigns had effectively pushed the enfeebled Ottomans
out of Europe. Yet by July, Greece and Serbia would clash with
Bulgaria in what’s known as the Second Balkan War -- a bitter
monthlong struggle that saw more territory change hands, more
villages razed and more bodies dumped into the earth.

The peace that followed was no peace at all. A year later, with
Europe’s great powers entwined in the fate of the Balkans, a
Yugoslav nationalist in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo killed the crown
prince of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Europe plunged into World War I.

“The Balkans,” goes one of the many witticisms attributed to
Winston Churchill, “generates more history than it can locally
consume.” To Churchill and many Western observers of his era, this
rugged stretch of southeastern Europe was a headache, a geopolitical
mess that had for centuries been at the crossroads of empires and
religions, riven by ethnic tribalisms and the meddling of outside
powers. Half a century earlier, Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck
-- the architect of the modern German state -- expressed his disgust
with this nuisance of a region, scoffing that the whole of the
Balkans was “not worth the bones of one Pomeranian grenadier” in
his employ.

But while these grand statesmen of the West saw a backward land
brimming with ancient hatreds, the Balkans’ turbulent past, and the
legacy of the Balkan wars in particular, perhaps offers a more
instructive history lesson for our present than even World War I.
This is not just because the Balkan wars spawned some historic firsts
on the battlefield -- such as the first instance when aircraft was
used to attack an enemy (by the Bulgarians) or some of the first grim
scenes of trench warfare in continental Europe (observers recount
how, in one trench, the legs of dead Turkish soldiers froze into the
ground and had to be hacked off). It’s because in many ways these
battles fought a century ago reflect our world today: one where
internecine and sectarian conflicts -- in, say, Syria or the
Democratic Republic of Congo -- are enmeshed in the agendas of
outside powers and where the trauma of that violence often augurs
more of the same.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/QFPFDA


■ 編集後記 ■


今回の記事はいかがでしたか。前号に続き、ヨーロッパ関連の話ということで
取り上げてみました。EUのノーベル賞はあんなに皮肉たっぷりに批判していた
のに、ちょっと前には、こんな具合に過酷なヨーロッパの歴史を書いています。
面白いものです。

さて、秋も深まり、プロ野球の季節もいよいよ佳境。中日でもいい、日ハムで
もいい。超大国の読売ジャイアンツをこてんぱんにやっつけてくれないかなあ。


posted by K.Andoh | Comment(0) | 国際 | このブログの読者になる |
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント:

認証コード: [必須入力]


※画像の中の文字を半角で入力してください。
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。