2012年11月20日

これが中国を治めることになる男たちだ


Meet the Men Who Will Rule China
( TIME )

In The Wizard of Oz, the ruler behind the curtain in the Emerald City
turns out to be not an imposing mystical force but a mere mortal --
and a rather unprepossessing one at that. On Nov. 15 in the heart of
Beijing, just a short walk from the Forbidden City, a line of seven
men -- all with neatly coiffed, dyed black hair -- emerged from
behind a giant screen adorned with red-crowned cranes. Thus at
shortly before noon was the world introduced to a powerful clique,
headed by Xi Jinping, that will rule China. The new Politburo
Standing Committee, as the clutch of seven is called, was unveiled at
the Communist-era Great Hall of the People, nearly an hour later than
was initially expected. First to stride the crimson-carpeted stage
was Xi, the new General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party and
longtime presumed heir of outgoing leader Hu Jintao. But even if Xi
walked out first, he is only the first among equals in a country that
has traded the personality cult of the Chairman Mao days for a
collective-leadership style. In China, there is not just one wizard,
but seven.

The new men in charge are, in the order they walked onto the stage,
Xi, followed by Li Keqiang, Zhang Dejiang, Yu Zhengsheng, Liu
Yunshan, Wang Qishan and Zhang Gaoli. Technically speaking, the
selection of the Standing Committee was conducted by a Communist
Party Central Committee with 205 members, itself chosen by the 2,000
or so delegates to the 18th Party Congress (representing 82.6 million
Chinese Communist Party members) that wrapped up its week-long summit
on Nov. 14. In reality, the Standing Committee’s composition was
more likely the result of intense back room negotiations between
forces loyal to Hu and his predecessor Jiang Zemin, among myriad
other factions that belie the unified reputation of the party that
has ruled China for 63 years.

Where will the seven men -- who strode carefully to seven spots pre-
marked with black tape on the stage -- take the People’s Republic?
Frankly, we don’t really know. These men have risen to the top in
part because of their ability to hide their personal quirks under a
cloak of Communist secrecy. But there are a few things we can divine
from the septet. First, the new Standing Committee is jammed with
princelings, the offspring of Communist Party elders who grew up
accustomed to the privileges of power, despite some tumultuous years
during the Cultural Revolution when the tide turned against these
coddled scions. Being a member of the crimson aristocracy doesn’t
dictate a Standing Committee member’s politics. Zhang Dejiang, who
walked third in line, is a North Korea-trained economist, while Wang
Qishan, No. 6, is considered more of a market-oriented reformer.
Still, one thing unites most of these princelings: they are acolytes
of former party chief Jiang, who at 86 years old still retains
surprising influence in party politics.

Xi’s ascension marked a break with a decade of leadership by the
ultimate colorless Communist cadre. When Hu Jintao took power a
decade ago, some hoped that he might usher in political reforms to
match China’s economic opening. Those hopes were dashed; over the
past 10 years, Hu felt more like a Party hologram than a flesh-and-
blood leader. Only twice in his tenure did he give substantive live
speeches to the Chinese people. By contrast, in his first remarks as
General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party on Thursday, the
broad-shouldered 59-year-old Xi cracked a spontaneous joke --
apologizing for keeping the assembled press waiting, a comment that
was not part of his official remarks -- and spoke naturally. His
delivery contrasted with the slow and emphatic whine of ideologically
tinged speech that mars so many Chinese leaders’ speaking styles,
most notably Hu’s.


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

meet:(初めて)会う

Hey, Taro. Come and meet my dad.

(さあ、太郎。こっちで父を紹介するよ。)

mortal:死ぬべく定められた(人間)

その反対の「不朽の(もの)」が「immortal」。

clique:(排他的な)徒党、派閥

この文は倒置構文です。主語は「the world」。文の流れを整えたり、意味を
強調したりするための倒置は、この後も何回か出てきます。

clutch:一群、一団、(めんどりの)ひとかえりの卵、ヒナ

presume:推定する、あえて・大胆に〜する


■ 2段落目

delegate:代表(者)、使節、派遣する

belie:裏切る、矛盾する

His acts belie his words.

(彼の行動は自分の言葉と矛盾する=言行が一致しない。)


■ 3段落目

quirk:奇癖、運命のいたずら

divine:神の、神性の、占う、予言する

princeling:(軽蔑的な意味合いで)小公子、幼君

中国で「太子党」と呼ばれている党高級幹部の師弟グループのことです。

coddle:甘やかす、大事に扱う、とろ火で煮る

scion:(接ぎ木の)接ぎ穂、(貴族・名門の)御曹子

acolyte:信奉者、取り巻き、(キリスト教)侍者


■ 4段落目

cadre:幹部、中核、組織

usher:(劇場・教会などの)案内係、先導する

The bombing of Hiroshima ushered in the nuclear age.

(ヒロシマの爆弾が核の時代の到来を告げた。)

spontaneous:自発的な、自然発生的な

whine:(犬などの)鼻を鳴らす声、泣き言、愚痴、すすり泣く

tinge:色合い加える、薄い色合い

mar:損なう、台なしにする


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


Meet the Men Who Will Rule China
( TIME )


In The Wizard of Oz,

the ruler behind the curtain in the Emerald City

turns out to be not an imposing mystical force but a mere mortal --

and a rather unprepossessing one at that.

On Nov. 15

in the heart of Beijing,

just a short walk from the Forbidden City,

a line of seven men --

all with neatly coiffed, dyed black hair --

emerged from behind a giant screen adorned with red-crowned cranes.

Thus at shortly before noon

was the world introduced to a powerful clique,

headed by Xi Jinping,

that will rule China.

The new Politburo Standing Committee,

as the clutch of seven is called,

was unveiled at the Communist-era Great Hall of the People,

nearly an hour later than was initially expected.

First to stride the crimson-carpeted stage was Xi,

the new General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party

and longtime presumed heir of outgoing leader Hu Jintao.

But even if Xi walked out first,

he is only the first among equals in a country

that has traded the personality cult of the Chairman Mao days

for a collective-leadership style.

In China,

there is not just one wizard, but seven.


The new men in charge are,

in the order they walked onto the stage,

Xi,

followed by Li Keqiang, Zhang Dejiang, Yu Zhengsheng, Liu Yunshan,
Wang Qishan and Zhang Gaoli.

Technically speaking,

the selection of the Standing Committee was conducted

by a Communist Party Central Committee with 205 members,

itself chosen by the 2,000 or so delegates to the 18th Party Congress

(representing 82.6 million Chinese Communist Party members)

that wrapped up its week-long summit on Nov. 14.

In reality,

the Standing Committee’s composition was more likely the result

of intense back room negotiations

between forces loyal to Hu and his predecessor Jiang Zemin,

among myriad other factions

that belie the unified reputation of the party

that has ruled China for 63 years.


Where will the seven men --

who strode carefully to seven spots

pre-marked with black tape on the stage --

take the People’s Republic?

Frankly, we don’t really know.

These men have risen to the top

in part because of their ability

to hide their personal quirks under a cloak of Communist secrecy.

But there are a few things we can divine from the septet.

First,

the new Standing Committee is jammed with princelings,

the offspring of Communist Party elders

who grew up accustomed to the privileges of power,

despite some tumultuous years during the Cultural Revolution

when the tide turned against these coddled scions.

Being a member of the crimson aristocracy

doesn’t dictate a Standing Committee member’s politics.

Zhang Dejiang,

who walked third in line,

is a North Korea-trained economist,

while Wang Qishan,

No. 6,

is considered more of a market-oriented reformer.

Still,

one thing unites most of these princelings:

they are acolytes of former party chief Jiang,

who at 86 years old

still retains surprising influence in party politics.


Xi’s ascension marked a break

with a decade of leadership by the ultimate colorless Communist cadre.


When Hu Jintao took power a decade ago,

some hoped

that he might usher in political reforms

to match China’s economic opening.

Those hopes were dashed;

over the past 10 years,

Hu felt more like a Party hologram than a flesh-and-blood leader.

Only twice in his tenure

did he give substantive live speeches to the Chinese people.

By contrast,

in his first remarks

as General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party on Thursday,

the broad-shouldered 59-year-old Xi cracked a spontaneous joke --

apologizing for keeping the assembled press waiting,

a comment that was not part of his official remarks --

and spoke naturally.

His delivery contrasted

with the slow and emphatic whine of ideologically tinged speech

that mars so many Chinese leaders’ speaking styles,

most notably Hu’s.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


これが中国を治めることになる男たちだ
( TIME )

「オズの魔法使」において、カーテンの裏にいた支配者は目を見張るような神
秘的な力の持ち主ではなくただの死すべきもの、それどころか冴えないタイプ
だった。11月15日、紫禁城から少し歩いたところにある北京の中心で、1列に
並んだ7人の男たち−−みな黒く染めた髪をきちんとなでつけていた−−が丹
頂鶴をあしらった大きなスクリーンの裏から姿を現した。こうして正午ちょっ
と前に、世界は紹介にあずかった。この強力な一団が習近平(シー・チンピ
ン)を先頭にして、中国を治めることになる。新しい政治局常務委員会−−7
人の集まりはこう呼ばれる−−は共産主義時代の人民大会堂でベールを脱いだ。
当初の予定より1時間ほど遅れた。最初に深紅の絨毯敷きの舞台に大股で上っ
たのは習だった。中国共産党の新しい総書記は長い間、退任する指導者・胡錦
濤の後継者と目されていた。だが、習が最初に歩み出たと言っても、同列の中
での最初にすぎない。同国は毛主席時代の個人崇拝を売却して集団指導体制を
手にした。中国には魔法使いが1人いるのではなく、7人いる。

新たに責務を担う男たちは、舞台に上った順番に従えば、習、続いて李克強
(リー・コーチアン)、張徳江、兪正声、劉雲山、王岐山、そして張高麗だ。
厳密に言えば、常務委員の選出は205人の会員からなる共産党中央委員会が行
い、中央委自体も第18回党大会の2000人余りの代理人(8260万人の中国共産党
員を代表する)が選んだ。党大会は11月14日に1週間にわたる頂上会合を終え
ていた。現実には常務委員の構成は、胡とその前任者の江沢民に忠を尽くす勢
力間の舞台裏での厳しい交渉の産物のようなものだった。一枚岩の評判とは裏
腹に、他にも無数の派閥が存在する。そうした党が中国を63年間治めている。

7人の男たち−−黒いテープであらかじめ印が付けられた舞台の7つの場所に慎
重に大股で進んだ−−は、人民共和国をどこに導こうとするのか。実のところ、
私たちにはよく分からない。この男たちが頂点に上ったのは、ひとつには個人
的な奇癖を共産党的な秘密主義のマントの下に隠す能力のおかげだ。そもそも、
新しい常務委員会は幼君たちで混み合っている。権力の恩恵に慣れ親しんで育
った共産党長老の子弟たちで、確かに文化大革命の間のあの騒乱の歳月は甘や
かされた御曹司たちにとって荒波だった。深紅の貴族の一員であることが常務
委員会の政治を左右するわけではない。列の3番目を歩いた張徳江は北朝鮮で
訓練を受けた経済学者であり、6位の王岐山は比較的に市場志向型の改革者だ
と考えられている。それでも、ひとつのことで幼君の大半はまとまっている。
彼らは元党首の江の信奉者だという点だ。86歳の江はいまだに党内政治で驚く
べき影響力を保っている。

習の昇進は、著しく生彩を欠く共産党組織が指導した10年間との途絶のしるし
だ。胡が10年前に権力の座に就いたとき、一部の人たちはこれで中国の開放経
済に見合った政治改革の幕が切って落とされるのではと期待した。そうした期
待は打ち砕かれた。この10年間、胡は血肉の通った指導者というより党のホロ
グラムのようなものだった。その任期でわずかに2度ほど国民向けの生の重要
演説をしただけだった。それとは対照的に木曜日、中国共産党総書記の最初の
発言で、肩幅の広い59歳の習はアドリブの冗談を飛ばし−−集まった報道陣を
待たせたことの謝罪で、公式の発言には含まれない一言だが−−、自然体で話
した。その話し方はゆっくりと重々しいイデオロギー色を帯びた哀調の演説と
は対照的だった。それはきわめて多くの中国の指導者の、分けても胡の語り口
を損ねていたものだった。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


Meet the Men Who Will Rule China
( TIME )

In The Wizard of Oz, the ruler behind the curtain in the Emerald City
turns out to be not an imposing mystical force but a mere mortal --
and a rather unprepossessing one at that. On Nov. 15 in the heart of
Beijing, just a short walk from the Forbidden City, a line of seven
men -- all with neatly coiffed, dyed black hair -- emerged from
behind a giant screen adorned with red-crowned cranes. Thus at
shortly before noon was the world introduced to a powerful clique,
headed by Xi Jinping, that will rule China. The new Politburo
Standing Committee, as the clutch of seven is called, was unveiled at
the Communist-era Great Hall of the People, nearly an hour later than
was initially expected. First to stride the crimson-carpeted stage
was Xi, the new General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party and
longtime presumed heir of outgoing leader Hu Jintao. But even if Xi
walked out first, he is only the first among equals in a country that
has traded the personality cult of the Chairman Mao days for a
collective-leadership style. In China, there is not just one wizard,
but seven.

The new men in charge are, in the order they walked onto the stage,
Xi, followed by Li Keqiang, Zhang Dejiang, Yu Zhengsheng, Liu
Yunshan, Wang Qishan and Zhang Gaoli. Technically speaking, the
selection of the Standing Committee was conducted by a Communist
Party Central Committee with 205 members, itself chosen by the 2,000
or so delegates to the 18th Party Congress (representing 82.6 million
Chinese Communist Party members) that wrapped up its week-long summit
on Nov. 14. In reality, the Standing Committee’s composition was
more likely the result of intense back room negotiations between
forces loyal to Hu and his predecessor Jiang Zemin, among myriad
other factions that belie the unified reputation of the party that
has ruled China for 63 years.

Where will the seven men -- who strode carefully to seven spots pre-
marked with black tape on the stage -- take the People’s Republic?
Frankly, we don’t really know. These men have risen to the top in
part because of their ability to hide their personal quirks under a
cloak of Communist secrecy. But there are a few things we can divine
from the septet. First, the new Standing Committee is jammed with
princelings, the offspring of Communist Party elders who grew up
accustomed to the privileges of power, despite some tumultuous years
during the Cultural Revolution when the tide turned against these
coddled scions. Being a member of the crimson aristocracy doesn’t
dictate a Standing Committee member’s politics. Zhang Dejiang, who
walked third in line, is a North Korea-trained economist, while Wang
Qishan, No. 6, is considered more of a market-oriented reformer.
Still, one thing unites most of these princelings: they are acolytes
of former party chief Jiang, who at 86 years old still retains
surprising influence in party politics.

Xi’s ascension marked a break with a decade of leadership by the
ultimate colorless Communist cadre. When Hu Jintao took power a
decade ago, some hoped that he might usher in political reforms to
match China’s economic opening. Those hopes were dashed; over the
past 10 years, Hu felt more like a Party hologram than a flesh-and-
blood leader. Only twice in his tenure did he give substantive live
speeches to the Chinese people. By contrast, in his first remarks as
General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party on Thursday, the
broad-shouldered 59-year-old Xi cracked a spontaneous joke --
apologizing for keeping the assembled press waiting, a comment that
was not part of his official remarks -- and spoke naturally. His
delivery contrasted with the slow and emphatic whine of ideologically
tinged speech that mars so many Chinese leaders’ speaking styles,
most notably Hu’s.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/U6ydd3


■ 編集後記 ■


今回の記事はいかがでしたか。「オズの魔法使」から始まって、意味深な言い
回しやら単語やらが使われています。めっきり寒くなってきましたが、そんな
点にも注意して読んでみてくださいな。


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