2013年02月13日

ニャンコが200マイル歩いて帰宅 猫の内なる方位磁石を科学する


How a Kitty Walked 200 Miles Home: The Science of Your Cat’s Inner
Compass
( TIME )

When a battered, skinny tortoiseshell cat wandered into a yard in
Florida earlier this year, she could have been any other stray, but
she was nothing of the kind. She carried an implanted microchip --
one put there by a loving owner -- and it revealed an intriguing
story: the cat belonged to a local family, had been lost on a trip
two months earlier, and had traveled 200 miles (322 km) in that time
to arrive back in her hometown. Her journey inspired a spate of
articles looking for an explanation for how this one cat, and a few
others who’ve made similar trips, managed such impressive feats of
navigation. The response from many eminent animal researchers was the
same: “No idea.”

Part of what navigating animals do is not entirely surprising.
Planetarium studies reveal that some animals steer by the stars, an
approach that’s comfortingly familiar to Homo sapiens but practiced
by organisms as distant as the nocturnal dung beetle, which, as one
recent study revealed, can roll its precious gob of poo in a straight
line only as long as the Milky Way is in view. One of the most
accomplished animal navigation researchers of the twentieth century,
naturalist Ronald Lockley, found that captured seabirds released far
from their homes could make a beeline back so long as either the sun
or the stars were visible; an overcast sky threw them off so much
that many never made it back.

But plenty of other navigating animals are using something most
humans regularly forget exists: the Earth’s magnetic field. In
illustrations, the field is usually depicted as a series of loops
that emerge from the south pole and reenter the planet at the north
pole, and extend out to the edges of our atmosphere, sort of like a
cosmic whisk. Our compass needles are designed to align with the
field, and in the last few decades it’s become clear that numerous
animals can find their way by feeling some of its various field.

To study this, he and colleagues collected baby sea turtles a few
hours before they would have left the nest on their own and put them
in pools surrounded by magnetic coils. The coils were designed to
reproduce the Earth’s magnetic field at specific points along the
turtles’ migration. Reliably, the young turtles oriented themselves
and swam in the direction relative to the magnetic field that, had
they been in the open ocean, would have kept them on course. Lohmann
has tested this with 8 different locations along their route, and in
each case the turtles head in just the direction required to get them
to their destination. The turtles may not know where they are in any
big-picture way -- as Lohmann says, they may not see themselves as
blinking spots on a map -- but they have inherited a sense that
should they feel a particular pull from the magnetic field, well,
better take a right.


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

batter:打ちのめす、めった打ちにする

最初の文を直訳すると、「打ちのめされた、やせ細ったさび猫が〜の庭に迷い
込んだときに、彼女はその他のあらゆる野良猫でありえただろうが、・・・」。
「have+完了形」で過去の可能性を表します。

intrigue:陰謀(を企てる)、好奇心・興味をそそる

journey:(通例陸上の比較的長い)旅行

「旅、旅行」を表す単語がたくさん出てきました。研究社の新英和中辞典にニ
ュアンスの違いを解説してもらいますと・・・

「travel」は、旅行の意のいちばん広い語で、特に遠い国または長期間にわた
る旅行。「trip」は、通例用事か遊びで出かけ、また帰ってくる旅行。
「journey」は、通例かなり長い、時として骨の折れる旅で、必ずしも帰って
くることは意味しない。

さらに・・・

「voyage」は、海上の比較的長い旅行。「tour」は、観光・視察などのための
計画に基づいて各地を訪れる周遊旅行。「excursion」は、レクリエーション
などのために多くの人が一緒に行なう短い旅行。

spate :(言葉などの)ほとばしり、多数、大水


■ 2段落目

nocturnal:夜間の、夜行性の

「nocturne」というのは、音楽の「ノクターン、夜想曲」。「昼行性の」が
「diurnal」。

beeline:一直線

ミツバチ(bee)は真っすぐに巣に戻ってくるからだそうです。


■ 3段落目

whisk:(台所用品の)泡立て器、小ぼうき、すばやく振る


■ 4段落目

migration: 移住、渡り

動詞形が「migrate」。外から入ってくる「移住、入国(管理)」が
「immigration」で、その反対が「emigration」ですね。

orient:正しい位置に置く、正しい方向に置く、適応させる

「oriented」が使われている文の後半、「 had they been …」以下は仮定法
過去完了です。「if」を省略して「had」を頭に置いた形です。「would have
kept …」の意味上の主語に当たるのが「the magnetic field」です。

inherit:遺伝する、相続する

いちばん最後も「if」を略して「should」が前に来た倒置構文です。「万一〜
すれば」という意味です。


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


How a Kitty Walked 200 Miles Home: The Science of Your Cat’s Inner
Compass
( TIME )


When a battered, skinny tortoiseshell cat

wandered into a yard in Florida earlier this year,

she could have been any other stray,

but she was nothing of the kind.

She carried an implanted microchip --

one put there by a loving owner --

and it revealed an intriguing story:

the cat belonged to a local family,

had been lost on a trip two months earlier,

and had traveled 200 miles (322 km) in that time

to arrive back in her hometown.

Her journey inspired a spate of articles

looking for an explanation

for how this one cat,

and a few others who’ve made similar trips,

managed such impressive feats of navigation.

The response from many eminent animal researchers was the same:

“No idea.”


Part of what navigating animals do is not entirely surprising.

Planetarium studies reveal

that some animals steer by the stars,

an approach

that’s comfortingly familiar to Homo sapiens

but practiced by organisms as distant as the nocturnal dung beetle,

which, as one recent study revealed,

can roll its precious gob of poo in a straight line

only as long as the Milky Way is in view.

One of the most accomplished animal navigation researchers of the
twentieth century,

naturalist Ronald Lockley, found

that captured seabirds released far from their homes

could make a beeline back

so long as either the sun or the stars were visible;

an overcast sky threw them off so much

that many never made it back.


But plenty of other navigating animals are using something

most humans regularly forget exists:

the Earth’s magnetic field.

In illustrations,

the field is usually depicted as a series of loops

that emerge from the south pole

and reenter the planet at the north pole,

and extend out to the edges of our atmosphere,

sort of like a cosmic whisk.

Our compass needles are designed to align with the field,

and in the last few decades

it’s become clear

that numerous animals can find their way

by feeling some of its various field.


To study this,

he and colleagues collected baby sea turtles

a few hours before they would have left the nest on their own

and put them in pools surrounded by magnetic coils.

The coils were designed to reproduce the Earth’s magnetic field

at specific points along the turtles’ migration.

Reliably,

the young turtles oriented themselves

and swam in the direction relative to the magnetic field

that, had they been in the open ocean,

would have kept them on course.

Lohmann has tested this with 8 different locations along their route,

and in each case

the turtles head in just the direction

required to get them to their destination.

The turtles may not know where they are in any big-picture way --

as Lohmann says,

they may not see themselves as blinking spots on a map --

but they have inherited a sense

that should they feel a particular pull from the magnetic field,

well, better take a right.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


ニャンコが200マイル歩いて帰宅 猫の内なる方位磁石を科学する
( TIME )

やせ細ってボロボロになったさび猫が今年初め、フロリダの人家の庭に迷い込
んだときには何の変哲もない野良猫の一匹かと思われたが、彼女はとてつもな
い代物だった。体にはマイクロチップが埋め込まれていた−−可愛がっていた
飼い主の手による−−のだが、それによって謎めいた物語が明らかになった。
その猫は地元の一家が所有していて、2カ月前の旅で行方不明になって、その
間に200マイル(322キロ)を移動して故郷に帰り着いたのだ。彼女の長旅に刺
激された記事が相次いで説明を探している。どうしてこの猫や、同じような旅
をしたいくつかの他の動物たちは、かくも印象的なナビゲーションの偉業を達
成できたのか。多くの高名な動物研究者の反応は同じものだった。「お手上
げ」

ナビ型動物がすることの一部は必ずしも驚くべきものではない。プラネタリウ
ムの研究によれば、ある種の動物は星をたよりに舵を取る。この方法はホモ・
サピエンスも慣れ親しんだものだが、夜行性のフンコロガシといった縁遠い生
物も実践していて、最近の研究によれば、彼らが貴重なうんちの固まりを一直
線に転がすのは決まって天の川が見えるときだ。20世紀に動物ナビゲーション
の研究で最大級の業績を上げた博物学者Ronald Lockleyの発見によれば、海鳥
を捕まえ巣から遠くで放しても真っ直ぐに帰ったのは太陽や星が見えるときだ
った。空が雲に覆われていると、彼らはひどくうろたえ、その多くは帰ること
ができなかった。

だが、その他のたくさんのナビ型動物が使っているのは、大方の人類がふだん
存在を忘れているものだ。地球磁場だ。図解すれば、磁場は一連の輪として表
現される。南極点から発して北極点で再び地球に入り、大気圏の外側へと広が
っている、いわば宇宙泡立て器のようなものだ。方位磁石の針は磁場に沿うよ
うに設計されている。そして、この数十年ではっきりしたのは、非常に多くの
動物がいくらかの磁場の違いを感じることで自らの進路を探すことができると
いうことだ。

このことを研究するために、彼とその同僚は、数時間前に自力で巣立ちするは
ずだったウミガメの赤ちゃんを捕まえて、磁気コイルを張り巡らせたプールに
放り込んだ。コイルは、カメの渡りに沿った特定の地点の地球磁場を再現する
ように設計された。あっぱれ、子ガメたちは自らの位置を確認して磁場が示す
方向に泳いだ。そこが大海だったら、彼らは正しいコースを守っていたことに
なる。Lohmannはルートに沿った8つの異なった場所で実験した。そしてどの場
合にも、カメたちは目的地に辿り着くために必要な方向にきちんと向かった。
カメたちは、自分たちがどこにいるのか俯瞰的な見地から知ることはできない
かもしれない−−Lohmannが言うように、彼らは自分たちの位置を地図上に点
滅する地点として見ることもできないかもしれない−−が、彼らには遺伝的に
備わった感覚がある。だから万一、磁場から特別な力を感じれば、「よし、
右に曲がったほうが良さそうだ」


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


How a Kitty Walked 200 Miles Home: The Science of Your Cat’s Inner
Compass
( TIME )

When a battered, skinny tortoiseshell cat wandered into a yard in
Florida earlier this year, she could have been any other stray, but
she was nothing of the kind. She carried an implanted microchip --
one put there by a loving owner -- and it revealed an intriguing
story: the cat belonged to a local family, had been lost on a trip
two months earlier, and had traveled 200 miles (322 km) in that time
to arrive back in her hometown. Her journey inspired a spate of
articles looking for an explanation for how this one cat, and a few
others who’ve made similar trips, managed such impressive feats of
navigation. The response from many eminent animal researchers was the
same: “No idea.”

Part of what navigating animals do is not entirely surprising.
Planetarium studies reveal that some animals steer by the stars, an
approach that’s comfortingly familiar to Homo sapiens but practiced
by organisms as distant as the nocturnal dung beetle, which, as one
recent study revealed, can roll its precious gob of poo in a straight
line only as long as the Milky Way is in view. One of the most
accomplished animal navigation researchers of the twentieth century,
naturalist Ronald Lockley, found that captured seabirds released far
from their homes could make a beeline back so long as either the sun
or the stars were visible; an overcast sky threw them off so much
that many never made it back.

But plenty of other navigating animals are using something most
humans regularly forget exists: the Earth’s magnetic field. In
illustrations, the field is usually depicted as a series of loops
that emerge from the south pole and reenter the planet at the north
pole, and extend out to the edges of our atmosphere, sort of like a
cosmic whisk. Our compass needles are designed to align with the
field, and in the last few decades it’s become clear that numerous
animals can find their way by feeling some of its various field.

To study this, he and colleagues collected baby sea turtles a few
hours before they would have left the nest on their own and put them
in pools surrounded by magnetic coils. The coils were designed to
reproduce the Earth’s magnetic field at specific points along the
turtles’ migration. Reliably, the young turtles oriented themselves
and swam in the direction relative to the magnetic field that, had
they been in the open ocean, would have kept them on course. Lohmann
has tested this with 8 different locations along their route, and in
each case the turtles head in just the direction required to get them
to their destination. The turtles may not know where they are in any
big-picture way -- as Lohmann says, they may not see themselves as
blinking spots on a map -- but they have inherited a sense that
should they feel a particular pull from the magnetic field, well,
better take a right.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/12I0Jc2


リスニング学習を兼ねて、この猫ちゃんの動画ニュースはこちらでどうぞ。

http://bit.ly/XyLa2y


■ 編集後記 ■


うちのワンコは老人性白内障で目が見えません。でも、トイレの場所をちゃん
と探し当てます!トイレというのは防水シートに新聞紙を重ねたところ。あち
こち歩き回って、おっとここがトイレだな。恐らくそんな感じで、足の裏の感
触で察しをつけるのでしょう。でも残念ながら、おちんちんは前足ではなく後
ろ足の間にあります。なので、おしっこの水溜りはいつも新聞紙からわずかに
外れた床の上に転がっているのです><


posted by K.Andoh | Comment(5) | 米国 | このブログの読者になる |
この記事へのコメント
はじめまして、メルマガの執筆お疲れ様です。
以前に英字新聞の読み方を学びたいと思い彷徨っていた際にはNY Timesを教材とした前メルマガを発見して「こんな素晴らしい学習方法があったのか!」と感動すると共に、既に終わっていることを知ってガッカリしてしまったのですが、新たにTIMEを使用したメルマガを始められていたのですね。
TIMEというと、英文読解の頂点という畏れと同時に、夢の雑誌という想いが強いのですが、こうして丁寧な解説付きで学習させて頂けるのは非常に有り難いことです。
NY Timesがネイティブの知識層向けの新聞で、Japan Times等よりも難易度が高いとは聞いていたのですが、TIMEは更に難解ですよね。
いつか自力で読める日が来るのか、途方もない目標のようにも感じておりますが、欠かさずメルマガを購読(過去の記事も復習します)を続けて読解力に磨きをかけて行きたいと思っております。
今後とも宜しくお願い致します。
Posted by 文月 at 2013年02月16日 14:52
Andoh様、

いつもブログを拝読してます。
英語の記事を「題だけ」翻訳して質問し合えるダイダケ(http://www.daidake.com)というユーザー投稿型ニュースサイトを経営している梅原と申します。

今回は、Andoh様が翻訳されている英語の記事をダイダケのユーザーにも紹介してもらいたいと思い、連絡させていただきました。
機会があれば、ダイダケに記事を投稿いただけないでしょうか?以下リンクのように、記事には投稿者のプロフィール(ホームページやTwitter等へのリンク付き)を添付することができるので、ブログのアクセスアップにつながります。
http://www.daidake.com/links/438-researchers-make-dna-data-storage-a-reality-every-film-and-tv-program-ever-created-in-a-teacup

ご質問等ありましたら、いつでもご連絡ください。
よろしくお願いします。

梅原一造
ichizo@daidake.com
Posted by 梅原 at 2013年02月17日 13:11
いつも解説と和訳、とてもありがたく拝見してます(毎回和訳を読んで、自分の解釈の間違いに気づきます)。
ワンちゃん、命中せず惜しい!笑・・・かくいう我が家の犬は目はまだ見えていますが勢い余って毎回トイレシートから外します。 目が見えない生活大変そうですが、飼い主さんが温かく見守ってらっしゃる様子で幸せそうですね。
Posted by きゃり子 at 2013年02月19日 19:31
文月さん、コメントありがとうございます。
僕が英語の勉強を始めたのはまだネットがない頃でした。当時は、一流のタイムが読めて一人前みたいな感じの英語の本がいろいろあって、やはり憧れと恐れを抱いたものです。
いま、タイムのネット版を読むと、やさしい記事もあれば、中身のない記事もあります。タイムなんてたいしたことないじゃん。そんな上から目線で取り組む姿勢も大事かもしれませんよ。
Posted by K.Andoh at 2013年02月20日 01:51
きゃり子さん、コメントありがとうございます。
ワンコはあっちで頭をコツン、こっちで頭をコツン。しばし立ち止まって何でだろ?みたいな顔をしています。お前さんは目が見えなくなったんだよと、突っ込みを入れたくもなりますが、当の本人はそれでも健気に歩き回っています。
英語の勉強も、この姿勢が一番大事なのかもしれませんね。
Posted by K.Andoh at 2013年02月20日 01:56
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント:

認証コード: [必須入力]


※画像の中の文字を半角で入力してください。
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。