2013年02月15日

発見 人類はネズミのひ孫だった


Found: Humanity’s Great-Grand-Rat
( TIME )

Most of us think we know exactly what we mean when we use the word
“mammal” -- and most of us are wrong. Typically, we think only of
the sub-group of mammals like us, the so-called placental mammals.
There are two other kinds, however: the egg-laying monotremes, which
include the duck-billed platypus; and the marsupials, which count
kangaroos, opossums and wombats among their ranks. But unless you
live in Australia and a few other spots, the vast majority of mammals
you run into, even at the zoo, are placentals, a group that
encompasses everything from rats to rhinos, gerbils to giraffes,
chipmunks to chimps, and, of course humans as well.

It wasn’t always thus, however. Mammals have been around for
hundreds of millions of years, but placentals for only tens of
millions. Now a new paper just published in Science purports to
pinpoint their, or rather, our, origins with impressive specificity.
The great-great grandfather of us all, argue the authors, was a
small, scurrying, insect-nibbling creature that arose a mere 200,000
to 400,000 years after the cataclysmic extinction event 65 million
years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs (or, more precisely, the non-
avian dinosaurs, since birds are now considered the one branch of the
dinosaur family that survived).

This may seem like just a number to you and me but for
paleontologists and evolutionary biologists, it’s something of a
bombshell. The prevailing wisdom since the 1990’s, based on
assumptions about how quickly mutations arise in DNA, was that the
placentals emerged and began to diversify a whopping 35 million
earlier, spurred by the breakup of the giant continent Pangea into
the smaller landmasses that exist today. They didn’t really flourish
until the dinosaurs went away -- but then, who could, with huge,
voracious lizards towering overhead?

All that impressive brainwork led us back to a rather humbling place:
You, your loved ones and your friends, not to mention Abe Lincoln,
Winston Churchill, Napoleon, Babe Ruth, Marilyn Monroe -- all of us,
in other words -- are the multi-multi-generational grandkids of a rat-
like, half-pound, furry-tailed bug-eater. Like it or not. The work,
Novacek promises, will go on. “This thing will continue to grow like
an organism. We have this important new result, but we also have a
playground for future research.” The science may advance, but our
egos may never recover.


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

rat:ネズミ、ラット

私がいま使っているパソコンのマウスやミッキーマウスの「mouse」も「ネズ
ミ」です。でも、「rat」のほうは英語圏では嫌われ者です。研究社・新英和
中辞典の説明を引いておきますと・・・

「rat」は、クマネズミ、ドブネズミなど大型のネズミをいう。日本にいる家
ネズミは「rat」で英米にいる家ネズミは「mouse」をさす。ラットは危険を察
していち早く逃げるとされ、そのイメージは卑劣・不潔などよくない。

placental:胎盤(placenta)の(ある動物)

monotreme:単孔類の動物

marsupial:有袋類の動物

encompass:取り囲む、包含する


■ 2段落目

purport:(実際はともかく)〜と称する、主張する

specificity:特定、特殊性

scurry:ちょこちょこ走る

nibble:少しずつかじる

cataclysmic:地殻変動(cataclysm)の、激変する


■ 3段落目

paleontologist:古生物学(paleontology)者

prevail:優勢である、流行している、勝る

assumption:思い込み、仮定、(任務などの)引き受け

辞書で要チェックの単語です。

whopping:とてつもなく大きい、途方もない

voracious:がつがつ食う、貪欲な

lizard:トカゲ


■ 4段落目

ここは、今回の発見は遺伝学やら解剖学やら各分野の最新データを逐一寄せて
もらって作った詳細なデータベースに基づくものだという話に続く記事の最後
のパラグラフで、そのことを「all that impressive brainwork」と言ってい
ます。

humble:(気持ちを)謙虚にする、(高慢を)くじく、謙遜な


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


Found: Humanity’s Great-Grand-Rat
( TIME )


Most of us think

we know exactly what we mean when we use the word “mammal” --

and most of us are wrong.

Typically,

we think only of the sub-group of mammals like us,

the so-called placental mammals.

There are two other kinds, however:

the egg-laying monotremes,

which include the duck-billed platypus;

and the marsupials,

which count kangaroos, opossums and wombats among their ranks.

But unless you live in Australia

and a few other spots,

the vast majority of mammals you run into,

even at the zoo,

are placentals,

a group

that encompasses everything

from rats to rhinos, gerbils to giraffes, chipmunks to chimps,

and, of course humans as well.


It wasn’t always thus, however.

Mammals have been around for hundreds of millions of years,

but placentals for only tens of millions.

Now a new paper just published in Science

purports to pinpoint their, or rather, our, origins

with impressive specificity.

The great-great grandfather of us all,

argue the authors,

was a small, scurrying, insect-nibbling creature

that arose a mere 200,000 to 400,000 years

after the cataclysmic extinction event 65 million years ago

that wiped out the dinosaurs

(or, more precisely, the non-avian dinosaurs,

since birds are now considered the one branch

of the dinosaur family that survived).


This may seem like just a number to you and me

but for paleontologists and evolutionary biologists,

it’s something of a bombshell.

The prevailing wisdom since the 1990’s,

based on assumptions

about how quickly mutations arise in DNA,

was that the placentals emerged and began to diversify

a whopping 35 million earlier,

spurred by the breakup of the giant continent Pangea

into the smaller landmasses that exist today.

They didn’t really flourish

until the dinosaurs went away --

but then, who could,

with huge, voracious lizards towering overhead?


All that impressive brainwork led us back to a rather humbling place:

You, your loved ones and your friends,

not to mention Abe Lincoln, Winston Churchill, Napoleon, Babe Ruth,
Marilyn Monroe --

all of us, in other words --

are the multi-multi-generational grandkids

of a rat-like, half-pound, furry-tailed bug-eater.

Like it or not.

The work, Novacek promises, will go on.

“This thing will continue to grow like an organism.

We have this important new result,

but we also have a playground for future research.”

The science may advance,

but our egos may never recover.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


発見 人類はネズミのひ孫だった
( TIME )

私たちのほとんどが正確に知っていると思っている。「哺乳類」という言葉を
使ったときに意味するものは何か。−−そして、私たちのほとんどが間違って
いる。通常、私たちは私たちのような哺乳類の下位集団だけを思い浮かべる。
いわゆる有胎盤哺乳類。しかし、他に2種類ある。1つは卵を生む単孔類で、カ
モノハシを含み、もう1つは有袋類で、カンガルーやオポッサム、ウオンバッ
トをその仲間に数える。だが、オーストラリアやその他のいくつかの場所に住
んでいない限り、出くわす大多数の哺乳類といえば、動物園でも有胎盤類だ。
この集団はネズミからサイ、アレチネズミからキリン、シマリスからチンパン
ジーまでのすべてを網羅する。そして、もちろん人類も。

しかし、いつでもこんな風だったわけではなかった。哺乳類は数億年も前から
いたが、有胎盤類は数千万年にすぎない。さて、「サイエンス」に発表された
ばかりの新論文が、彼らの、いやむしろ私たちの起源を絞りに絞って探り当て
たと称している。私たちすべての曾々祖父は、著者によれば、ちょこちょこと
走り回って昆虫をかじっていた小さな生き物だった。6500万年前の壊滅的な絶
滅劇で恐竜(いや、より正しくは非鳥類型恐竜だ。今では、鳥類は生き延びた
恐竜の種族の一派だと考えられている)が一掃されてから、わずか20万年から
40万年後に出現した。

これはあなたや私にはただの数字に見えるかもしれないが、古生物学者や進化
生物学者にとってはかなり衝撃的な事件だ。1990年代から優勢だった知見はDN
Aの突然変異はすぐに出現するという想定に基づき、有胎盤類は法外にもさら
に3500万年も前に誕生して多様化を始め、パンゲア巨大大陸が今日存在するも
っと小さい陸塊へと分裂したことで拍車がかかったとしていた。彼らは恐竜が
退場するまであまり繁栄しなかった。−−それにしても、誰にそんなことがで
きよう、頭上には巨大で貪欲なトカゲがそびえ立っていたのだ。

これらのすぐれて人間的な頭脳作業のおかげで、私たちは鼻を折られるような
思いを味わうことになる。あなたや、愛する人や友達や、もちろんエイブ・
リンカーンやウインストン・チャーチルやナポレオンやベーブ・ルースやマリ
リン・モンローも−−換言すれば、私たちすべて−−が、柔毛状の尻尾を持ち、
虫を食べる、半ポンドのネズミのような存在の多世代を経た孫なのだ。 好む
と好まざるとにかかわらず。作業はどんどん進むと、Novacekは約束する。
「この仕事は生命体のように成長し続ける。私たちはこうして重要な成果を上
げたが、同時に将来の研究のための遊び場もできた」。科学は進歩するかもし
れないが、私たちのエゴは決して回復しないのかもしれない。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


Found: Humanity’s Great-Grand-Rat
( TIME )

Most of us think we know exactly what we mean when we use the word
“mammal” -- and most of us are wrong. Typically, we think only of
the sub-group of mammals like us, the so-called placental mammals.
There are two other kinds, however: the egg-laying monotremes, which
include the duck-billed platypus; and the marsupials, which count
kangaroos, opossums and wombats among their ranks. But unless you
live in Australia and a few other spots, the vast majority of mammals
you run into, even at the zoo, are placentals, a group that
encompasses everything from rats to rhinos, gerbils to giraffes,
chipmunks to chimps, and, of course humans as well.

It wasn’t always thus, however. Mammals have been around for
hundreds of millions of years, but placentals for only tens of
millions. Now a new paper just published in Science purports to
pinpoint their, or rather, our, origins with impressive specificity.
The great-great grandfather of us all, argue the authors, was a
small, scurrying, insect-nibbling creature that arose a mere 200,000
to 400,000 years after the cataclysmic extinction event 65 million
years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs (or, more precisely, the non-
avian dinosaurs, since birds are now considered the one branch of the
dinosaur family that survived).

This may seem like just a number to you and me but for
paleontologists and evolutionary biologists, it’s something of a
bombshell. The prevailing wisdom since the 1990’s, based on
assumptions about how quickly mutations arise in DNA, was that the
placentals emerged and began to diversify a whopping 35 million
earlier, spurred by the breakup of the giant continent Pangea into
the smaller landmasses that exist today. They didn’t really flourish
until the dinosaurs went away -- but then, who could, with huge,
voracious lizards towering overhead?

All that impressive brainwork led us back to a rather humbling place:
You, your loved ones and your friends, not to mention Abe Lincoln,
Winston Churchill, Napoleon, Babe Ruth, Marilyn Monroe -- all of us,
in other words -- are the multi-multi-generational grandkids of a rat-
like, half-pound, furry-tailed bug-eater. Like it or not. The work,
Novacek promises, will go on. “This thing will continue to grow like
an organism. We have this important new result, but we also have a
playground for future research.” The science may advance, but our
egos may never recover.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/158B381


■ 編集後記 ■


頼みもしないのに、毎年必ずやって来ます。ネズミだった(サルでもいいんで
すが)ら、こんな淋しい思いをしないで済むのに・・・と、思わないでもあり
ません。でも、いいんです。甘い物、好きじゃありませんので。

今年もレバニラ炒めのレバーをチョコだと思って食べました。美味しいな。ネ
ズミはあんまりレバニラ食べられないだろうな。人間になれて良かった。これ
も、エゴ?



posted by K.Andoh | Comment(0) | 科学 | このブログの読者になる |
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント:

認証コード: [必須入力]


※画像の中の文字を半角で入力してください。
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。