2013年02月19日

宇宙岩石の嵐 心配はいらない・・・今のところは


The Storm of Space Rocks: Nothing to Worry About -- For Now
( TIME )

Alright people, let’s move on. Nothing to see here. You know that
asteroid of death that whizzed by Earth today at an altitude that’s
actually below some of our satellites? You know that meteor that
exploded in the skies over Russia today, injuring nearly 1,000
people? And you know all that speculation that they’re somehow
connected -- that the Earth has stumbled into some kind of storm-
front of space rocks, any one of which will annihilate us eventually?
Forget it. The two incidents have absolutely nothing to do with each
other, and neither one should cause us all that much worry. Yet.

It’s fair to say that if you live in the city of Chelyabinsk just to
the east of Russia’s Ural mountains, you don’t want to be told
that the blast that shook the region on an otherwise brilliantly
clear day is nothing to worry about. At 9:20 AM local time, what is
thought to have been a 10-ton rock moving 33,000 mph (54,000 k/h)
exploded at an altitude of 18 to 32 miles (30 to 50 km), producing a
several kiloton blast that damaged at least 270 buildings, sent
hundreds of people streaming to hospitals for lacerations from flying
glass and other debris and caused 20,000 emergency response workers
to be mobilized. So that ain’t nothing. And after all the talk about
the planet’s just-passed close shave with a much larger, 70-ton, 150
ft. (45 m) asteroid, it’s no wonder people are skittish.

But as Time reports in this week’s edition (available to subscribers
here), this is nothing new. Earth has always lived in a cosmic
shooting gallery, one that sends about 100 tons of debris plunging
into our atmosphere every day. Most of it is no bigger than a pea and
burns up long before it hits the ground, but we get at least one
basketball-sized object every day too and at least one rock as big as
a small car every few months. Much larger pieces come along less
frequently -- but inevitably.

But even if the Chelyabinsk blast was a routine thing -- as far as
exploding space rocks go, at least -- that doesn’t mean that
asteroid ordnance poses no danger. If 2012 DA14 had plunged through
the atmosphere, it would have produced a 2.4 megaton blast,
equivalent to 180 Hiroshima bombs. Russia already knew a thing or
two about that kind of devastation: in 1908, a 330 ft. (100 m)
asteroid exploded over the Tunguska region in the central part of the
country, producing a 30 megaton blast -- about 1,000 Hiroshimas --
and leveling trees across 830 sq. mi. (2,150 sq. km).


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

asteroid:小惑星

whiz:ピュー、ビュー(と鳴る)、風を切って飛ぶ・走る

altitude:高度、標高

何回か繰り返される「You know …?」という文の文法的な形は、「あなたは、
いくつかの私たちの衛星より実際に低かった高度で今日、地球のそばをびゅー
っと飛んだあの死の小惑星を知っているでしょう?」。

meteor:隕石、流星

隕石と流れ星の違いはウィキペディアでどうぞ。

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%B5%81%E6%98%9F

annihilate:全滅させる、絶滅させる


■ 2段落目

この段落の最初の文は、「もしあなたが〜に住んでいたら、あなたは・・・と
言われたくないと言うのは正当(fair)だ」。

laceration:傷つけること、裂傷

debris:(破壊物の)破片、瓦礫

発音は「デブリー」です。

close shave: 間一髪の危機脱出

「close call」とも言います。

skittish:(馬などが)ものに驚きやすい、物怖じする


■ 4段落目

ordnance:大砲、兵器、軍需品、兵站部

equivalent:(価値・数量など)同等の、同価値の

level:平ら(な)、平らにする


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


The Storm of Space Rocks: Nothing to Worry About -- For Now
( TIME )


Alright people, let’s move on.

Nothing to see here.

You know that asteroid of death

that whizzed by Earth today at an altitude

that’s actually below some of our satellites?

You know that meteor

that exploded in the skies over Russia today,

injuring nearly 1,000 people?

And you know all that speculation

that they’re somehow connected --

that the Earth has stumbled

into some kind of storm-front of space rocks,

any one of which will annihilate us eventually?

Forget it.

The two incidents have absolutely nothing to do with each other,

and neither one should cause us all that much worry.

Yet.


It’s fair to say

that if you live in the city of Chelyabinsk

just to the east of Russia’s Ural mountains,

you don’t want to be told

that the blast

that shook the region on an otherwise brilliantly clear day

is nothing to worry about.

At 9:20 AM local time,

what

is thought to have been a 10-ton rock moving 33,000 mph (54,000 k/h)

exploded at an altitude of 18 to 32 miles (30 to 50 km),

producing a several kiloton blast

that damaged at least 270 buildings,

sent hundreds of people streaming to hospitals

for lacerations from flying glass and other debris

and caused 20,000 emergency response workers to be mobilized.

So that ain’t nothing.

And after all the talk

about the planet’s just-passed close shave

with a much larger, 70-ton, 150 ft. (45 m) asteroid,

it’s no wonder people are skittish.


But as Time reports in this week’s edition

(available to subscribers here),

this is nothing new.

Earth has always lived in a cosmic shooting gallery,

one

that sends about 100 tons of debris plunging into our atmosphere

every day.

Most of it is no bigger than a pea

and burns up long before it hits the ground,

but we get at least one basketball-sized object every day too

and at least one rock as big as a small car every few months.

Much larger pieces come along less frequently --

but inevitably.


But even if the Chelyabinsk blast was a routine thing --

as far as exploding space rocks go, at least --

that doesn’t mean

that asteroid ordnance poses no danger.

If 2012 DA14 had plunged through the atmosphere,

it would have produced a 2.4 megaton blast,

equivalent to 180 Hiroshima bombs.

Russia already knew a thing or two about that kind of devastation:

in 1908,

a 330 ft. (100 m) asteroid exploded over the Tunguska region

in the central part of the country,

producing a 30 megaton blast --

about 1,000 Hiroshimas --

and leveling trees across 830 sq. mi. (2,150 sq. km).


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


宇宙岩石の嵐 心配はいらない・・・今のところは
( TIME )

人々よ、大丈夫だ。前に進もう。ここに見えるものはない。例の死の小惑星が
今日、実際にいくつかの人工衛星より低い高度で地球のそばを爆走したじゃな
いかって?ロシアの上空では隕石が爆発して、約1000人の負傷者が出たじゃな
いかって?そして、こうした観測はすべて何らかの形でつながっていて、地球
は宇宙岩石の嵐の前線のようなものに巻き込まれて、その岩石のいずれかによ
って私たちはやがて全滅するんじゃないかって?まさか。この2つの出来事は
互いにまったく関係がない。そして、そのどちらにも私たちは皆そんなにひど
く心配することはない。今のところは。

こんな発言ならもっともだ。ロシアのウラル山脈のちょうど東にあるチェリャ
ビンスクという都市に住んでいるのだから、それがなければうららかに晴れた
一日だった地域を揺るがした爆風が心配に及ばないものだなんて言われたくな
い。現地時間の午前9時20分、時速3万3000マイル(5万4000キロメートル)で
飛んでいた10トンの岩石だったと考えられているものが、高度18から32マイル
で爆発して数キロトンの爆風が発生し、少なくとも270の建物が破壊され、何
百人もの人々が飛び散ったガラスやその他の破片による裂傷のために絶え間な
く病院へと運び込まれ、そして2万人の緊急対応作業員が動員されたのだ。だ
から、それは何でもないという話ではない。そして、この惑星の危機一髪のと
ころを通過したもっと大きい70トン、150フィート(45メートル)の小惑星を
めぐる話があれこれ出た後なのだから、人々が浮き足立っても不思議ではない。

だが、タイムが今週号で報告したように(定期購読者はこちらから入手可能)、
これは目新しいことではない。地球は昔から宇宙射的場に住んでいる。約100
トンの破片が毎日、大気圏を突き破って送り込まれてくるところだ。そのほと
んどはエンドウ豆ほどの大きさで、地面にぶつかるずっと前に燃え尽きてしま
うが、少なくとも1個のバスケットボール・サイズの物体もまた毎日届き、そ
して少なくとも1個の小型車なみの大きさの岩石も数カ月ごとに届く。さらに
大きな品物はそれほど頻繁にはやって来ないが、それでも来るときには来る。

だが、チェリャビンスクの爆風が日常的な事件だったとしても−−少なくとも、
宇宙岩石の爆発に関する限りは−−、小惑星の重砲が危険をもたらさないとい
うことにはならない。もし2012DA14が大気圏を突き破っていたら、180個のヒ
ロシマの爆弾に匹敵する2,4メガトンの爆風が発生していただろう。ロシアは
すでに一二のこうした大破壊を知っている。1908年には、330フィート(100
メートル)の小惑星が国の中央部にあるツングースカ川地域の上空で爆発し、
30メガトンの爆風−−ヒロシマの約1000個分−−が発生し、830平方マイル(2
150平方キロメートル)の木々がなぎ倒された。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


The Storm of Space Rocks: Nothing to Worry About -- For Now
( TIME )

Alright people, let’s move on. Nothing to see here. You know that
asteroid of death that whizzed by Earth today at an altitude that’s
actually below some of our satellites? You know that meteor that
exploded in the skies over Russia today, injuring nearly 1,000
people? And you know all that speculation that they’re somehow
connected -- that the Earth has stumbled into some kind of storm-
front of space rocks, any one of which will annihilate us eventually?
Forget it. The two incidents have absolutely nothing to do with each
other, and neither one should cause us all that much worry. Yet.

It’s fair to say that if you live in the city of Chelyabinsk just to
the east of Russia’s Ural mountains, you don’t want to be told
that the blast that shook the region on an otherwise brilliantly
clear day is nothing to worry about. At 9:20 AM local time, what is
thought to have been a 10-ton rock moving 33,000 mph (54,000 k/h)
exploded at an altitude of 18 to 32 miles (30 to 50 km), producing a
several kiloton blast that damaged at least 270 buildings, sent
hundreds of people streaming to hospitals for lacerations from flying
glass and other debris and caused 20,000 emergency response workers
to be mobilized. So that ain’t nothing. And after all the talk about
the planet’s just-passed close shave with a much larger, 70-ton, 150
ft. (45 m) asteroid, it’s no wonder people are skittish.

But as Time reports in this week’s edition (available to subscribers
here), this is nothing new. Earth has always lived in a cosmic
shooting gallery, one that sends about 100 tons of debris plunging
into our atmosphere every day. Most of it is no bigger than a pea and
burns up long before it hits the ground, but we get at least one
basketball-sized object every day too and at least one rock as big as
a small car every few months. Much larger pieces come along less
frequently -- but inevitably.

But even if the Chelyabinsk blast was a routine thing -- as far as
exploding space rocks go, at least -- that doesn’t mean that
asteroid ordnance poses no danger. If 2012 DA14 had plunged through
the atmosphere, it would have produced a 2.4 megaton blast,
equivalent to 180 Hiroshima bombs. Russia already knew a thing or
two about that kind of devastation: in 1908, a 330 ft. (100 m)
asteroid exploded over the Tunguska region in the central part of the
country, producing a 30 megaton blast -- about 1,000 Hiroshimas --
and leveling trees across 830 sq. mi. (2,150 sq. km).


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
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http://ti.me/VyIYtZ


■ 編集後記 ■


夜空に一筋の光がさっと走って、あっ、流れ星だと、急いで手を合わせるとい
うのならロマンチックな光景ですが、一応そいつと親戚みたいなものにせよス
ケールの桁が違うでっかいのがドカンと目の前に落ちてくる、そんなハリウッ
ド超大作SF映画みたいな話がリアルに起こりうるのだということを教えてくれ
た、皆さん、怪我で済んで何よりでしたの、びっくり仰天の貴重な映像でした。


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