2013年02月22日

世界で最も恐ろしい環境に関する事実


The Scariest Environmental Fact in the World
( TIME )

See this sobering graph from the U.S. Energy Information
Administration (EIA):

As the data show, China is now burning almost as much coal as the
rest of the world -- combined. And despite impressive support from
Beijing for renewable energy and a dawning understanding about the
dangers of air pollution, coal use in China is poised to continue
rising, if slower than it has in recent years. That’s deadly for the
Chinese people -- see the truly horrific air pollution in Beijing
this past month -- and it’s dangerous for the rest of the world.
Coal already accounts for 20% of global greenhouse-gas emissions,
making it one of the biggest causes of man-made climate change.
Combine that with the direct damage that air pollution from coal
combustion does to human health, and there’s a reason why some have
called coal the enemy of the human race.

Of course, there’s a reason why coal is so popular in China and in
much of the rest of the world: it’s very, very cheap. And that’s
why, despite the danger coal poses to health and the environment,
neither China nor many other rapidly growing developing nations are
likely to turn away from it. (If you really want to get scared, see
this report from the International Energy Agency -- hat tip to Ed
Crooks of the Financial Times -- which notes that by 2017, India
could be importing as much coal as China.) That’s likely to remain
the case in poor nations until clean energy can compete with coal on
price -- and that day hasn’t come yet.

The EIA’s chart also shows how limited President Obama’s ability to
deal with climate change really is. The reality is that the vast
majority of the carbon emissions to come will be emitted by
developing nations like China -- and much of that will be due to
coal. As we’ve reported, the U.S. has reduced coal use and cut
carbon emissions in recent years, even in the absence of
comprehensive climate legislation, thanks to tougher air-pollution
regulations and cheap natural gas from fracking. Yet even as coal has
waned in the U.S., it’s still being burned by the gigaton in other
countries. We won’t beat climate change until we’ve beaten coal,
but I’m not sure there’s much the U.S. can do to persuade China or
India to quit cheap energy -- no matter the cost.


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

sober:素面の、酒を飲んでいない、酔いをさます、まじめにする

この後にあるグラフは記事本文でご覧あれ。


■ 2段落目

dawn:夜が明ける、夜明け、(ものが)現われだす

「夕暮れ」が「dusk」。

poise:平衡(状態)、態度、(ある姿勢に)構える

account:計算、口座、考慮、説明する、原因となる、(割合を)占める

combustion:燃焼


■ 3段落目

hat tip:(挨拶や敬意を示すために)帽子を軽く持ち上げること


■ 4段落目

due to 〜:〜が原因で、する予定で、に支払うべき

(hydraulic)fracturing:水圧破砕法

米国では現在、この新技術を利用したシェール・ガス(shale gas)の採掘が
盛んです。シェール・ガスは環境にも優しいと言われています。詳しくはウィ
キペディアでどうぞ。

http://bit.ly/130SWpN

wane:(月が)欠ける、(光・力などが)弱くなる、衰える


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


The Scariest Environmental Fact in the World
( TIME )


See this sobering graph

from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA):


As the data show,

China is now burning almost as much coal as the rest of the world --

combined.

And despite impressive support from Beijing

for renewable energy

and a dawning understanding about the dangers of air pollution,

coal use in China is poised to continue rising,

if slower than it has in recent years.

That’s deadly for the Chinese people --

see the truly horrific air pollution in Beijing this past month --

and it’s dangerous for the rest of the world.

Coal already accounts for 20% of global greenhouse-gas emissions,

making it one of the biggest causes of man-made climate change.

Combine that

with the direct damage

that air pollution from coal combustion does to human health,

and there’s a reason

why some have called coal the enemy of the human race.


Of course,

there’s a reason

why coal is so popular in China and in much of the rest of the world:

it’s very, very cheap.

And that’s why,

despite the danger coal poses to health and the environment,

neither China nor many other rapidly growing developing nations

are likely to turn away from it.

(If you really want to get scared,

see this report from the International Energy Agency --

hat tip to Ed Crooks of the Financial Times --

which notes

that by 2017, India could be importing as much coal as China.)

That’s likely to remain the case in poor nations

until clean energy can compete with coal on price --

and that day hasn’t come yet.


The EIA’s chart also shows

how limited

President Obama’s ability to deal with climate change

really is.

The reality is

that the vast majority of the carbon emissions to come

will be emitted by developing nations like China --

and much of that will be due to coal.

As we’ve reported,

the U.S. has reduced coal use and cut carbon emissions

in recent years,

even in the absence of comprehensive climate legislation,

thanks to tougher air-pollution regulations

and cheap natural gas from fracking.

Yet even as coal has waned in the U.S.,

it’s still being burned by the gigaton in other countries.

We won’t beat climate change until we’ve beaten coal,

but I’m not sure

there’s much

the U.S. can do to persuade China or India to quit cheap energy --

no matter the cost.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


世界で最も恐ろしい環境に関する事実
( TIME )

この酔いも覚めるような米エネルギー情報局(EIA)のグラフを見よ。

データが示すように、中国は今、世界の残りの国々−−すべて合わせて−−と
変わらない量の石炭を燃やしている。そして、再生可能エネルギーに対する北
京の立派な支持や大気汚染についての理解の芽生えにもかかわらず、中国の石
炭利用は、近年よりは緩やかになったとはいえ、伸び続けそうな態勢にある。
これは中国の人々にとって致死的な事態−−心底からぞっとするような先月の
北京の大気汚染を見よ−−であり、世界の残りの国々にとっても危険な事態だ。
石炭はすでに世界の温室効果ガス排出の20パーセントを占め、人為的気候変動
の最大級の原因になっている。このことと、石炭燃焼による大気汚染が人の健
康に及ぼす直接的な被害を組み合わせれば、一部の人たちが石炭を人類の敵と
呼んできたことに理由はある。

もちろん、石炭が中国や世界のその他の国々の多くでかくも人気があるのには
理由がある。それはきわめて安いからだ。そしてそれ故に、石炭には健康や環
境にもたらす危険性があるにもかかわらず、中国やその他の多くの急速に成長
している新興国が方向を転じる可能性は低い(実際に怖い思いをしたいなら、
国際エネルギー機関のこの報告書−−フィナンシャル・タイムズ紙のエド・ク
ルックスに帽を脱ぐ−−を見よ。これによれば、2007年には、インドは中国と
変わらない量の石炭を輸入していることになる)。この状態はクリーン・エネ
ルギーが価格で石炭に対抗できるようにならない限り、貧困国にそのまま残る
可能性があり−−そして、その日はまだ来ていない。

EIAの図表はまた、実際にオバマ大統領が気候変動に対処できることがいかに
限られているかを示している。現実を言えば、もたらされる炭素排出の大多数
は中国のような新興国から排出され−−そして、その多くは石炭ということに
なる。私たちが報告したように、米国は近年、石炭利用を縮小し、また炭素排
出を削減してきた。包括的な気候法制定こそなかったものの、大気汚染規制の
強化と水圧破砕による安い天然ガスのおかげだった。だが、石炭は米国で翳り
を見せていても、その他の国々ではまだギガトン単位で燃やされている。私た
ちは石炭を叩かない限り、気候変動を叩くことはできないのだが、私には、米
国に中国やインドに安いエネルギーから手を引くよう説得する手立て−−どん
なに犠牲を払うにせよ−−が多くあるのかは分からない。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


The Scariest Environmental Fact in the World
( TIME )

See this sobering graph from the U.S. Energy Information
Administration (EIA):

As the data show, China is now burning almost as much coal as the
rest of the world -- combined. And despite impressive support from
Beijing for renewable energy and a dawning understanding about the
dangers of air pollution, coal use in China is poised to continue
rising, if slower than it has in recent years. That’s deadly for the
Chinese people -- see the truly horrific air pollution in Beijing
this past month -- and it’s dangerous for the rest of the world.
Coal already accounts for 20% of global greenhouse-gas emissions,
making it one of the biggest causes of man-made climate change.
Combine that with the direct damage that air pollution from coal
combustion does to human health, and there’s a reason why some have
called coal the enemy of the human race.

Of course, there’s a reason why coal is so popular in China and in
much of the rest of the world: it’s very, very cheap. And that’s
why, despite the danger coal poses to health and the environment,
neither China nor many other rapidly growing developing nations are
likely to turn away from it. (If you really want to get scared, see
this report from the International Energy Agency -- hat tip to Ed
Crooks of the Financial Times -- which notes that by 2017, India
could be importing as much coal as China.) That’s likely to remain
the case in poor nations until clean energy can compete with coal on
price -- and that day hasn’t come yet.

The EIA’s chart also shows how limited President Obama’s ability to
deal with climate change really is. The reality is that the vast
majority of the carbon emissions to come will be emitted by
developing nations like China -- and much of that will be due to
coal. As we’ve reported, the U.S. has reduced coal use and cut
carbon emissions in recent years, even in the absence of
comprehensive climate legislation, thanks to tougher air-pollution
regulations and cheap natural gas from fracking. Yet even as coal has
waned in the U.S., it’s still being burned by the gigaton in other
countries. We won’t beat climate change until we’ve beaten coal,
but I’m not sure there’s much the U.S. can do to persuade China or
India to quit cheap energy -- no matter the cost.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/WTGQeY


■ 編集後記 ■


メルマガの配信が700号を超えました。元来が三日坊主。我ながらびっくりの
数字です。英語の腕は上がったのか。実感はありません。相変わらず、分から
ないことばかり。北京の空はひどいものです。でも、私の頭の上の英語の空も
なかなか晴れ渡ってくれないようです。


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