2013年02月26日

問題は古く答えは少なく 安倍首相とオバマ大統領が緊張するアジアの安全保障を議論する


Old Questions and Few Answers As Japan’s Abe and Obama Discuss Asia
Security Tensions
( TIME )

On Shinzo Abe’s first trip to the United States as Japan’s prime
minister, the key issues included the rise of China, North Korea’s
quest for nuclear weapons and whether Japan would revise its
constitution to allow a standing military. The year was 2007, the
U.S. president was George W. Bush and the global economy had yet to
begin its spectacular implosion. Since then Japan has had five prime
ministers, but as Abe, who resumed his country’s top office in
December, visited Washington again Friday, the agenda was remarkably
similar to what he discussed with President Obama’s predecessor six
years ago.

The escalating Sino-Japanese tensions have prompted some concerns
that the Diaoyu dispute could, 100 years after World War I, set off a
similar devastating armed conflict. Certainly some parallels exist
with the great conflagration that tore apart Europe. China, like
Germany before, is a rising economic and military power that craves
greater respect and global influence. It is engaged in disputes with
several of its neighbors over islands that it says are rightly its
territory. Japan’s defense treaty with the U.S. only increases the
risk that a small incident at sea could, like the assassination of a
little-known archiduke in 1914, lead to a broader war.

An all-out conflict would harm both sides, with both China and Japan
-- the world’s second and third largest economies -- suffering
significant economic loses, says Linda Jakobson, East Asia program
director at the Lowy Institute, an Australian think tank. “I fear a
naval or air incident that leads to loss of life, which in today’s
world could not be kept secret, would ignite national sentiments to a
much higher degree than we’ve seen so far,” she says. “That would
really box in the leaders of each side and drastically curtail
maneuvering room.” And while China’s military clout is growing
rapidly -- it’s posted double-digit budget increases for much of the
past two decades and recently launched its first aircraft carrier --
it hasn’t been tested in combat since a short, bloody border war
with Vietnam in 1979. An unsuccessful military campaign could have
serious repercussions for the Communist Party’s hold on power, its
overriding priority.

Meanwhile in the waters northeast of Taiwan the dispute over the
islets continued this week, as a Japanese fishing boat captain said
his ship was pursued by three Chinese maritime surveillance vessels
on Feb. 18, according to reports from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun
newspaper and Tomas Etzler, a Czech television correspondent who was
on the Japanese vessel. On Friday, Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary
Yoshihide Suga complained that China’s State Maritime Administration
had installed buoys near the islets, the New York Times reported. War
may still be a distant prospect, but so too is a solution.


■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

standing military:常備軍、正規軍

implosion:(真空管などの)内破


■ 2段落目

set off:(爆弾・火薬を)爆発させる、(機械・装置を〉始動させる

parallel:平行の、平行している、類似(するもの)

「with …」は「parallel」にかかっています。

conflagration:大火災、大火

archduke:大公(1918 年までの旧オーストリア国皇子の称)


■ 3段落目

all-out:総力をあげての、全面的な、徹底した

box in:(人を)閉じ込める、動きを邪魔する

maneuver:(車などを巧みに)動かす、操作する、作戦行動、戦略

clout:(手で)殴ること、(政治的な)権力、影響力

repercussion:(音の)反響、(事件などの)影響、余波

overriding:他のすべてに優先する、主要な

動詞の「override」が「覆す、乗り越える」。


■ 4段落目

prospect:予想、前途、展望、将来性、見込みがある人、調査


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


Old Questions and Few Answers As Japan’s Abe and Obama Discuss Asia
Security Tensions
( TIME )


On Shinzo Abe’s first trip to the United States

as Japan’s prime minister,

the key issues included the rise of China,

North Korea’s quest for nuclear weapons

and whether Japan would revise its constitution

to allow a standing military.

The year was 2007,

the U.S. president was George W. Bush

and the global economy had yet to begin its spectacular implosion.

Since then

Japan has had five prime ministers,

but as Abe,

who resumed his country’s top office in December,

visited Washington again Friday,

the agenda was remarkably similar

to what he discussed with President Obama’s predecessor six years ago.


The escalating Sino-Japanese tensions have prompted some concerns

that the Diaoyu dispute could,

100 years after World War I,

set off a similar devastating armed conflict.

Certainly some parallels exist with the great conflagration

that tore apart Europe.

China,

like Germany before,

is a rising economic and military power

that craves greater respect and global influence.

It is engaged in disputes with several of its neighbors

over islands

that it says are rightly its territory.

Japan’s defense treaty with the U.S. only increases the risk

that a small incident at sea could,

like the assassination of a little-known archiduke in 1914,

lead to a broader war.


An all-out conflict would harm both sides,
with both China and Japan --

the world’s second and third largest economies --

suffering significant economic loses,

says Linda Jakobson,

East Asia program director at the Lowy Institute,

an Australian think tank.

“I fear a naval or air incident that leads to loss of life,

which in today’s world could not be kept secret,

would ignite national sentiments to a much higher degree

than we’ve seen so far,”

she says.

“That would really box in the leaders of each side

and drastically curtail maneuvering room.”

And while China’s military clout is growing rapidly --

it’s posted double-digit budget increases

for much of the past two decades

and recently launched its first aircraft carrier --

it hasn’t been tested in combat

since a short, bloody border war with Vietnam in 1979.

An unsuccessful military campaign could have serious repercussions

for the Communist Party’s hold on power,

its overriding priority.


Meanwhile in the waters northeast of Taiwan

the dispute over the islets continued this week,

as a Japanese fishing boat captain said

his ship was pursued by three Chinese maritime surveillance vessels

on Feb. 18,

according to reports from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper

and Tomas Etzler,

a Czech television correspondent who was on the Japanese vessel.

On Friday,

Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga complained

that China’s State Maritime Administration had installed buoys

near the islets,

the New York Times reported.

War may still be a distant prospect,

but so too is a solution.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


問題は古く答えは少なく 安倍首相とオバマ大統領が緊張するアジアの安全保
障を議論する
( TIME )

安倍晋三が日本の首相として初めて米国を訪れたときの主要課題は、中国の台
頭と北朝鮮の核兵器への野望、そして憲法を改正して正規軍を認めるかどうか
などだった。その年は2007年だった。米大統領はジョージ・W・ブッシュであ
り、世界経済の壮絶な内部崩壊もまだ始まっていなかった。以来、日本は5人
の首相を擁したが、12月に同国のトップの地位に返り咲いた安倍が金曜日に再
びワシントンを訪問したときの議題は、6年前にオバマ大統領の前任者と議論
したものと驚くほど変わりがなかった。

中日間の緊張の高まりがかなりの懸念を呼んでいる。釣魚台の紛争によって、
第一次世界大戦から100年を経て同じような壊滅的な武力衝突が勃発しかねな
いからだ。確かに、ヨーロッパを粉砕した大火との類似点が存在する。中国は
当時のドイツのように経済と軍事の大国として台頭し、大きな尊敬と世界的な
影響力を渇望している。いくつかの近隣諸国と島々をめぐる紛争に関わって、
領土の正当性を主張している。日本の米国との防衛条約は危険性を高めるばか
りで、1914年のほぼ無名の大公の暗殺のような小さな事件でも、大規模な戦争
につながりかねない。

全面衝突は両国の痛手となり、中国と日本−−それぞれ世界第2位と第3位の経
済国だ−−は重大な経済的損失を被りかねないと、豪州のシンクタンクである
ロウィー研究所東アジア・プログラム・ディレクターのリンダ・ヤコブソンは
言う。「私は海軍または空軍による人命の損失につながる事件を恐れています。
今日の世界でそれを隠しておくことはまずできないので、これまで目にするこ
とがなかったほどの激しい国民感情に火をつけかねません」と、彼女は言う。
「そうなれば両国の指導者は本当に身動きが取れなくなって、戦略上の手足を
もぎ取られることになる」。そして、中国の軍事的な力は急速に伸びている−
−ほぼ過去20年間、予算は2桁の上昇を記録し、最近は初の航空母艦を進水さ
せた−−が、1979年のベトナムとの短期間の血なまぐさい国境戦争以来、実戦
で試験をしていない。軍事行動の不首尾は、絶対的な優先事項である共産党の
政権維持に影響を及ぼしかねない。

この間、台湾北東の海域では、小島をめぐる紛争は今週も続いた。日本漁船の
船長は、中国海軍の監視船に追跡されたと話した。アサヒ・シンブン紙と日本
船に乗ったチェコのテレビ特派員Tomas Etzlerが伝えた。金曜日には日本の菅
義偉内閣官房長官が、中国国家海事管理局が小島の近くにブイを設置したこと
を抗議した。ニューヨーク・タイムズが報じた。戦争はまだ遠い可能性の話か
もしれないが、解決もまた然りだ。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


Old Questions and Few Answers As Japan’s Abe and Obama Discuss Asia
Security Tensions
( TIME )

On Shinzo Abe’s first trip to the United States as Japan’s prime
minister, the key issues included the rise of China, North Korea’s
quest for nuclear weapons and whether Japan would revise its
constitution to allow a standing military. The year was 2007, the
U.S. president was George W. Bush and the global economy had yet to
begin its spectacular implosion. Since then Japan has had five prime
ministers, but as Abe, who resumed his country’s top office in
December, visited Washington again Friday, the agenda was remarkably
similar to what he discussed with President Obama’s predecessor six
years ago.

The escalating Sino-Japanese tensions have prompted some concerns
that the Diaoyu dispute could, 100 years after World War I, set off a
similar devastating armed conflict. Certainly some parallels exist
with the great conflagration that tore apart Europe. China, like
Germany before, is a rising economic and military power that craves
greater respect and global influence. It is engaged in disputes with
several of its neighbors over islands that it says are rightly its
territory. Japan’s defense treaty with the U.S. only increases the
risk that a small incident at sea could, like the assassination of a
little-known archiduke in 1914, lead to a broader war.

An all-out conflict would harm both sides, with both China and Japan
-- the world’s second and third largest economies -- suffering
significant economic loses, says Linda Jakobson, East Asia program
director at the Lowy Institute, an Australian think tank. “I fear a
naval or air incident that leads to loss of life, which in today’s
world could not be kept secret, would ignite national sentiments to a
much higher degree than we’ve seen so far,” she says. “That would
really box in the leaders of each side and drastically curtail
maneuvering room.” And while China’s military clout is growing
rapidly -- it’s posted double-digit budget increases for much of the
past two decades and recently launched its first aircraft carrier --
it hasn’t been tested in combat since a short, bloody border war
with Vietnam in 1979. An unsuccessful military campaign could have
serious repercussions for the Communist Party’s hold on power, its
overriding priority.

Meanwhile in the waters northeast of Taiwan the dispute over the
islets continued this week, as a Japanese fishing boat captain said
his ship was pursued by three Chinese maritime surveillance vessels
on Feb. 18, according to reports from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun
newspaper and Tomas Etzler, a Czech television correspondent who was
on the Japanese vessel. On Friday, Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary
Yoshihide Suga complained that China’s State Maritime Administration
had installed buoys near the islets, the New York Times reported. War
may still be a distant prospect, but so too is a solution.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/Zuuw3n


■ 編集後記 ■


風はまだ身を切るような冷たさですが、日差しはもう春の色。気がつけば、2
月もおしまい。こんなに早く季節はめぐるのに、アジア情勢は遅々として進ま
ず。相変わらずのお話ですが、時事英語に頻出する単語も多く使われているの
で取り上げた次第です。


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