2013年03月01日

中央銀行の大実験 無制限の現金は問題を解決するのか、引き起こすのか


※編集後記にお知らせがあります。

The Great Central-Banking Experiment: Will Unlimited Cash Solve
Problems or Cause Them?
( TIME )

The Bank of Japan folded as easily as a hot slice of New York pizza.
After a few weeks of pounding by newly installed Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe, the BOJ’s (officially independent) managers capitulated
on Jan. 22 to his demands that the central bank hike its inflation
target to 2% (from 1%) and undertake the necessary monetary easing to
meet that target. That means the BOJ will keep printing cash until
Japanese deflation is reversed. “One can say that it marks a
‘regime change’ in managing macroeconomic policy,” a victorious
Abe declared.

A regime change it is, and it isn’t just taking place in Japan. With
the BOJ’s surrender, all three of the world’s major central banks
have committed themselves to open-ended, cash-pumping programs to
stimulate economies and protect financial stability. The Federal
Reserve has pledged to keep easing until the U.S. job market
improves. And in September, the European Central Bank promised to
purchase unlimited amounts of certain government bonds for any
troubled country that signs up to a reform program -- a move ECB
President Mario Draghi took to help quell the euro zone’s debt
crisis. These moves, of course, are on top of the already generous
policies the three banks have implemented since the 2008 Lehman
Brothers collapse.

Whether these experiments in supereasy money are wise or not, well,
that’s another matter. The classical economist in me immediately
hears sirens go off. Money is like any other commodity -- the more of
it there is, the less it is worth. At some point, the deluge of cash
could create a tsunami of inflation. Prices of assets could get
distorted, blowing up more bubbles that can pop and crash economies.

But then again, perhaps my thinking is stuck in an outdated ideology.
Paul Krugman seems to think so. According to a recent column in the
New York Times, I’m one of the Very Serious People, as he calls us,
trapped in a misguided certitude that has held back smart
policymaking in a new economic world. Krugman specifically was
writing about Japan, an economy he knows well, and he was cheering on
Abe’s heavy-spending approach to the country’s problems. The reason
why Japan has been an economic mess for 20 years, Krugman asserts, is
that the government and the BOJ have never gone far enough in pumping
the economy back to health. Abe’s aggressive policies, Krugman
asserts, will finally turn Japan around -- and, in the process,
rewrite the rules of economic policymaking:

Mr. Abe is breaking with a bad orthodoxy. And if he succeeds,
something remarkable may be about to happen: Japan, which pioneered
the economics of stagnation, may also end up showing the rest of us
the way out.



■ Uh-huh... なるへそ特記事項 ■


■ 1段落目

capitulate:降伏する、屈服する、従う

meet:会う、(必要・義務・要求など)応じる、満たす

regime:政体、体制、制度


■ 2段落目

surrender:降伏、降参(する)、身を任せる、明け渡す

open-ended:(時間・目的などに)制限のない、自由な

pump:ポンプ、(ポンプで)汲み上げる、注入する

「pump money into advertising」で「宣伝にお金をつぎ込む」。記事の後段
では「pump the economy back to health」という形で出てきます。

generous:気前のよい、惜しみなく与える、寛大な


■ 3段落目

easy money:楽にもうかる金、悪銭、低利の融資金

なので、「金融緩和政策」を「easy-money policy」と言ったりします。記事
では「supereasy money」。

commodity:商品、日用品、有用な品

American Heritageの例文ですが、最近はこんな風にもよく使われます。

Left-handed, power-hitting third basemen are a rare commodity in the
big leagues.

(左利きの強打の三塁手はメジャー・リーグで珍しい存在だ。)

deluge:大洪水、氾濫


■ 4段落目

certitude:確信、確実性

「certainty」のお固い言葉だそうです。


■ 5段落目

このパラグラフはポール・クルーグマン先生の記事の引用です。

stagnation:沈滞、不振、停滞、低迷、よどみ

way out:出口、降車口、(困難などからの)脱出方法


■ さらば日本語ふむふむ読み ■


The Great Central-Banking Experiment: Will Unlimited Cash Solve
Problems or Cause Them?
( TIME )


The Bank of Japan folded as easily as a hot slice of New York pizza.

After a few weeks

of pounding by newly installed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe,

the BOJ’s (officially independent) managers

capitulated on Jan. 22 to his demands

that the central bank hike its inflation target to 2% (from 1%)

and undertake the necessary monetary easing to meet that target.

That means the BOJ will keep printing cash

until Japanese deflation is reversed.

“One can say

that it marks a ‘regime change’ in managing macroeconomic policy,”

a victorious Abe declared.


A regime change it is, and it isn’t just taking place in Japan.

With the BOJ’s surrender,

all three of the world’s major central banks

have committed themselves to open-ended, cash-pumping programs

to stimulate economies and protect financial stability.

The Federal Reserve has pledged to keep easing

until the U.S. job market improves.

And in September,

the European Central Bank promised

to purchase unlimited amounts of certain government bonds

for any troubled country that signs up to a reform program --

a move

ECB President Mario Draghi took

to help quell the euro zone’s debt crisis.

These moves,

of course,

are on top of the already generous policies

the three banks have implemented

since the 2008 Lehman Brothers collapse.


Whether these experiments in supereasy money are wise or not,

well, that’s another matter.

The classical economist in me immediately hears

sirens go off.

Money is like any other commodity --

the more of it there is, the less it is worth.

At some point,

the deluge of cash could create a tsunami of inflation.

Prices of assets could get distorted,

blowing up more bubbles that can pop and crash economies.


But then again,

perhaps my thinking is stuck in an outdated ideology.

Paul Krugman seems to think so.

According to a recent column in the New York Times,

I’m one of the Very Serious People,

as he calls us,

trapped in a misguided certitude

that has held back smart policymaking in a new economic world.

Krugman specifically was writing about Japan,

an economy he knows well,

and he was cheering

on Abe’s heavy-spending approach to the country’s problems.

The reason why Japan has been an economic mess for 20 years,

Krugman asserts,

is

that the government and the BOJ have never gone far enough

in pumping the economy back to health.

Abe’s aggressive policies,

Krugman asserts,

will finally turn Japan around --

and, in the process,

rewrite the rules of economic policymaking:


Mr. Abe is breaking with a bad orthodoxy.

And if he succeeds,

something remarkable may be about to happen:

Japan,

which pioneered the economics of stagnation,

may also end up showing the rest of us the way out.


■ お帰り日本語ふむなる試訳 ■


中央銀行の大実験 無制限の現金は問題を解決するのか、引き起こすのか
( TIME )

日本銀行(BOJ)はニューヨークの熱いピザのように簡単に折れた。新しく就
任した安倍晋三首相に数週間叩かれたあげく、BOJ(公的には独立している)
の経営陣は1月22日、要求に屈した。中央銀行はインフレ目標を(1%から)2
%に引き上げ、その目標を達成すべく必要な金融緩和に取り組まなければなら
ない。これによってBOJは日本のデフレが反転するまで、紙幣を刷り続けるこ
とになる。「これはマクロ経済政策の『レジーム・チェンジ』を示すものだと
言える」と、勝者の安倍は宣言した。

なるほどこれはレジーム・チェンジだが、何も日本だけで行われているのでは
ない。BOJの降伏によって、世界の主要中央銀行の3つすべてが際限なくポンプ
で現金を注ぎ込む計画に全力を上げ、経済を刺激し金融の安定を守ることにな
った。連邦準備銀行は、米雇用市場が改善するまで緩和を続けると誓約した。
そして9月には欧州中央銀行(ECB)が、問題を抱えた国であっても改革計画に
署名していればその国債を無制限に購入すると約束した。これはECBのマリ
オ・ドラギ総裁がユーロ圏の債務危機の鎮火を促進すべく取った動きだ。こう
した動きはもちろん前々からの寛容政策に輪をかけたもので、3銀行は2008年
のリーマン・ブラザーズ崩壊以来、この手の政策を実施していた。

こうした超金融緩和の実験が賢明なものなのかどうか、まあ、それがもう1つ
の問題だ。私の中の古典派経済学者は、すぐにサイレンが鳴るのを聞きつける。
金は他のどんな商品とも変わらない。つまり、それが増えれば増えるほどその
価値は減っていく。ある時点で、現金の氾濫はインフレのツナミを引き起こし
かねない。資産の価格は歪み、経済をパンと破裂させるバブルをさらに膨らま
せかねない。

とは言うものの、恐らく私の考え方は時代遅れのイデオロギーに縛られている。
ポール・クルーグマンはそう考えているようだ。最近のニューヨーク・タイム
ズのコラムによれば、私のような「ひどく真面目な人々」(と彼は呼ぶ)は誤
った確信性にとらわれ、新しい経済世界での機敏な政策決定を寄せつけなかっ
た。クルーグマンははっきりと日本のことを書いていた。その経済に精通し、
安倍の同国の問題に対する大規模支出の手法を喝采していた。日本が20年間、
経済的混乱にあった理由は、クルーグマンの主張によれば、政府とBOJが度を
越してまで経済をポンプで健康な状態に押し上げようとしなかったからだ。安
倍の積極的な政策は、クルーグマンの主張では、ようやく日本を好転させ、そ
してその過程で、経済的な政策決定の規則も書き換えられる・・・

安倍氏は悪しき正統派的慣行と決別しようとしている。そして、もしそれが成
功するのなら、注目すべきことがまさに今起ころうとしているのかもしれない。
日本は不況型経済の先駆けだったが、加えて私たちすべてにそこからの出口を
示してくれることになるのかもしれない。


■ もう一度ふむなるTIMEしよう! ■


The Great Central-Banking Experiment: Will Unlimited Cash Solve
Problems or Cause Them?
( TIME )

The Bank of Japan folded as easily as a hot slice of New York pizza.
After a few weeks of pounding by newly installed Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe, the BOJ’s (officially independent) managers capitulated
on Jan. 22 to his demands that the central bank hike its inflation
target to 2% (from 1%) and undertake the necessary monetary easing to
meet that target. That means the BOJ will keep printing cash until
Japanese deflation is reversed. “One can say that it marks a
‘regime change’ in managing macroeconomic policy,” a victorious
Abe declared.

A regime change it is, and it isn’t just taking place in Japan. With
the BOJ’s surrender, all three of the world’s major central banks
have committed themselves to open-ended, cash-pumping programs to
stimulate economies and protect financial stability. The Federal
Reserve has pledged to keep easing until the U.S. job market
improves. And in September, the European Central Bank promised to
purchase unlimited amounts of certain government bonds for any
troubled country that signs up to a reform program -- a move ECB
President Mario Draghi took to help quell the euro zone’s debt
crisis. These moves, of course, are on top of the already generous
policies the three banks have implemented since the 2008 Lehman
Brothers collapse.

Whether these experiments in supereasy money are wise or not, well,
that’s another matter. The classical economist in me immediately
hears sirens go off. Money is like any other commodity -- the more of
it there is, the less it is worth. At some point, the deluge of cash
could create a tsunami of inflation. Prices of assets could get
distorted, blowing up more bubbles that can pop and crash economies.

But then again, perhaps my thinking is stuck in an outdated ideology.
Paul Krugman seems to think so. According to a recent column in the
New York Times, I’m one of the Very Serious People, as he calls us,
trapped in a misguided certitude that has held back smart
policymaking in a new economic world. Krugman specifically was
writing about Japan, an economy he knows well, and he was cheering on
Abe’s heavy-spending approach to the country’s problems. The reason
why Japan has been an economic mess for 20 years, Krugman asserts, is
that the government and the BOJ have never gone far enough in pumping
the economy back to health. Abe’s aggressive policies, Krugman
asserts, will finally turn Japan around -- and, in the process,
rewrite the rules of economic policymaking:

Mr. Abe is breaking with a bad orthodoxy. And if he succeeds,
something remarkable may be about to happen: Japan, which pioneered
the economics of stagnation, may also end up showing the rest of us
the way out.


■ もっとふむなるしたい人は、記事の続きも読んでみよう!
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://ti.me/X5KvGu


■ 編集後記 ■


アベノミクス、ノーベル賞経済学者からお墨付きをもらいました。果たして
「出口」の先はバラ色の未来なのか。ちょっと前の記事ですが取り上げておき
ましょう。

という訳で、しばらくお休みします。侍ジャパンの応援に全力投球するついで
に、メルマガとサイトのリニューアルをしようかなと思っています。まだぼん
やりしたイメージだけで、具体的には何も決まっていないのですが。

再開予定はサクラが咲く頃です。予想だと東京は3月25日?間に合うかしらん。
でも、北海道なら5月なのか。ふむふむ。


posted by K.Andoh | Comment(4) | 国際 | このブログの読者になる |
この記事へのコメント
久々に嬉しくメルマガ拝見しました。
大変な毎日と思いますががんばってください・・・私も世帯に老人を抱えているので介護問題は切実です。
歌、セミプロではないですか!^^
Posted by marimo at 2013年08月31日 19:02
お久し振りです。
メルマガ受け取りました。

気長に待ちつつも、もしかしたら何かあったのでは...と心配になっていたところだったのですが、編集後記を拝読して納得しました。今や介護による負担や悩みは国民的課題の一つかと思います。
自身の母親(母子家庭なので一人)も今はまだ動けていますが、少しずつ身体の不調を訴え始めているため、最近、本気で将来への不安が募り始めています。

今回受け取った記事のふむなるを心待ちにしつつ、少しでも生活が落ち着かれることを願っています。

歌、お上手で驚きました(*^_^*)
Posted by 文月葵 at 2013年08月31日 19:47
marimoさん、コメントありがとうです。
いやん、セミプロだなんて!
では、再開メルマガ(ブログ)は英語歌カラオケ教室みたいなのにしちゃいましょうか^^;
介護一色の生活だけは避けたいので、必ずメルマガは復活します!
嬉しいコメントに力も湧いてきたので、頑張らなくっちゃ!
Posted by K.Andoh at 2013年09月03日 00:42
文月葵さん、コメントありがとうです。
高齢化社会の真ん中で暮らしていたのに、こういう事態になって初めて町中に介護サービスの車がたくさん走っていることに気がつきました。
そんな迂闊な僕よりも、文月葵さんはしっかりしていそうなので大丈夫ですよ。
こうしたメルマガ(ブログ)は定期的に出すのが肝要と思いますので、その態勢が整いましたら、必ず復活させます。
温かいコメントに少しでも応えなくっちゃ!
Posted by K.Andoh at 2013年09月03日 00:44
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント:

認証コード: [必須入力]


※画像の中の文字を半角で入力してください。
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。